Limerick farmers in ‘dire straits’ over lack of road repairs

Donal O’Regan

Reporter:

Donal O’Regan

FARMERS told a Kilmallock local area meeting the lack of repairs to the upper Garryvurragha road in Kilbehenny has left them in dire straits.

FARMERS told a Kilmallock local area meeting the lack of repairs to the upper Garryvurragha road in Kilbehenny has left them in dire straits.

Farmers, Ken Hughes, Dinny Fitzgerald and Michael Landers, who also represented his brother, said they were in “dire straits”.

They say there is “no road to speak of” due to the surface being washed away. As well as explaining the problem they provided a solution to council staff.

Mr Landers says the road is so bad that one of the tyres on their slurry tank was punctured. He explained that they can’t use the road to spread slurry even when there is a few dry days.

“It’s at a really critical level. We have twice the slurry space required of by regulations but it is getting higher and higher,” said Mr Landers.

Me Hughes said his home’s well is close to the tank and a slurry leak into the watercourse would result in his drinking water being contaminated.

He says he has been held to ransom for the last nine months because the road isn’t able to take commercial deliveries and he can’t do building work on his farm.

Mr Fitzgerald said he uses the road to get bales of silage from A to B and it is very difficult with a “tractor and loader”.

Away from farming, in an emergency they said that a fire engine couldn’t get down the road.

In a detailed submission they proposed drainage work and concrete to be poured as tar and chip is just washed away.

John Madden, engineer, agreed with the solution but said it was a “question of funding”. He estimated the cost at around €60,000.

Paul Crowe, director of service, said he saw the road and a number of other roads in Galbally, Anglesboro, Glenroe.

“It [Garryvurragha} might be the worst but not by much. Some others are in a similar situation. We have limited funding and have got no notification of grants yet,” said Mr Crowe.

He said that some counties have almost abandoned doing work on tertiary roads.

“We’re not that bad but we’re not far off,” said Mr Crowe.

It was decided to adjourn the matter until the next meeting when they know the levels of grants.

Mr Hughes said the urgency of the issue isn’t being appreciated and the men are to meet to decide their next course of action.

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