Monaleen pupils learn to grow it themselves

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

CHILDREN from Scoil Moin a Lin rolled up their sleeves and got their hands dirty planting vegetables and herbs in their school garden on Monday as part of the Sow & Grow schools pledge, which is sponsored by innocent and Grow it Yourself (GIY).

CHILDREN from Scoil Moin a Lin rolled up their sleeves and got their hands dirty planting vegetables and herbs in their school garden on Monday as part of the Sow & Grow schools pledge, which is sponsored by innocent and Grow it Yourself (GIY).

On hand to help on the day and tell the pupils about the benefits of growing their own was local gardener James Vaughan.

“It was fantastic to see the children showing such an interest and I just gave them a talk about what vegetables they can grow at home and how to do it. Afterwards, they sowed some Basil, Cress and Tomatoes,” said James Vaughan who is a gardening and horticulture tutor with the Limerick city VEC.

The innocent and GIY Sow & Grow schools pledge is aiming to encourage 15,000 children in schools nationwide to grow their own by providing seeds, pots, growing guides and lesson plans.

Every class that gets involved in the initiative is in with a chance to win prizes worth €2,500 and one year’s mentorship from their local GIY expert.

The winning class will also get a day trip to Dublin Zoo and the Capital’s Bloom festival where they will be presented with their prize by home cook and food writer, Donal Skehan.

“I’m really delighted to be part of the innocent and Grow-it-Yourself Sow & Grow schools pledge,” he said.

“We want as many primary schools in Ireland to take part and get kids growing. It’s so important for kids to know where their food comes from and there is a real sense of achievement in growing your own food and using it to create delicious recipes. So roll up the sleeves and let’s get planting,” added Donal Skehan.

GIY’s vision is for a healthier, more connected and more sustainable world where people grow their own food.

The not-for-profit organisation brings people together in community groups and online to inspire and empower them to grow vegetables.

There are over 100 GIY community groups around Ireland involving around 30,000 people.