Hit comedy It’s The Real McCoy arrives at the Lime Tree

Nora and Cora: Deirdre O'Meara and Mary Marren in It's The Real McCoy which comes to the Lime Tree Theatre this week
ALL good things must come to an end. After nearly 200 performances in theatres the length and breadth of the country, one of Ireland’s funniest comedy plays will draw to a close at the Lime Tree this month.

ALL good things must come to an end. After nearly 200 performances in theatres the length and breadth of the country, one of Ireland’s funniest comedy plays will draw to a close at the Lime Tree this month.

It’s The Real McCoy - one of the longest running continuous touring productions of an original play by an amateur group in Ireland - comes to the Lime Tree Theatre for the final two performances of the play by the original cast.

Playwright Tommy Marren, a current-affairs presenter with Midwest Radio in Mayo, decided three years ago to “engage in an experiment”.

Intrigued by the hundreds of old Irish sayings he had heard as a youngster growing up in rural Sligo, he set out to write a play utilising the witty one-liners and thus the play was born.

“Old Irish sayings always fascinated me and I wanted to do something different in order to archive this part of our culture for future generations,” he explains.

“I could have simply written them all in book form but I wanted to put them in context so that people really understood the true meaning of the sayings and I thought what better way than in a play. It has proven to be an overwhelming success,” he says of the play, which has toured to the UK and America.

Set in rural Ireland over two days in the spring of 1964, the play tells story of Madge Molloy, who has lived over forty years of her life wondering why her husband Tom, whom she was married to for just five months, disappeared without trace or reason. The now embittered Madge discovers the circumstances behind her husband’s hasty exit via the arrival of a new curate to the parish.

“I think the kitchen set itself evokes memories of what kitchens looked like back then,” he explained.

“Secondly, the storyline sucks the audience in right from the start but without giving away the end right until the second last line of the play itself and the most important thing of all is the characters.

“So the entire ‘mix’ has captured the imagination of people beyond my wildest expectations and the audiences are leaving the theatre on a real high,” he adds.

For a show that was due to be performed for ten dates and will hit the 200 mark on its debut at the Lime Tree, It’s The Real McCoy clearly resonates with audiences, so don’t miss out.