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28/07/2021

Positive Parenting:: Setting and maintaining well-meaning boundaries

Positive Parenting:: Setting and maintaining well-meaning boundaries

When your child breaks a rule or a boundary, it can be helpful to respond to this behaviour promptly, sensitively and assertively

Children are more likely to feel more secure and to behave better when they experience consistency and routine. Many parents noticed children’s behaviour become more challenging during the lockdowns when our daily routine changed. This topic is relevant to parents now more than ever as we move from the routine of school to Summer holidays.

As parents, it is our job to take charge, whenever necessary. Predictable routines and firm boundaries allow children to know what to expect and who they can rely on so they then have the confidence to explore the world around them and develop new skills. Sometimes, to avoid conflict, parents feel unable to set boundaries and rules and follow them though and this puts the child in charge. This can be frightening for children as they are not developed cognitively enough to manage being in charge.

Putting boundaries and rules in place can be difficult, especially if children have gotten used to life without many boundaries or without hearing “no” very often. However, we must remember that it is never too late to make a change. It is also important to keep our boundaries and rules realistic. For example, it is not realistic to try to implement a boundary that our children must never disagree with each other. It is more realistic to set the boundary that we can disagree with our siblings but we must never hit or that we must always try to resolve our disagreements with words.

In trying to maintain some house rules and boundaries for our children we must try the same approach. It is not realistic to suggest that if a house rule is broken, we remove all gaming devices for the rest of the week. Rather, if a house rule is broken, we might reduce the time spent on gaming that evening by 15 minutes.

When your child breaks a rule or a boundary, it can be helpful to respond to this behaviour promptly, sensitively and assertively. A helpful technique for this is The Broken Record technique. If for example, your child breaks the house rule of tidying their bedroom on a Saturday morning. Try to keep your voice calm and soft in dealing with the matter. Here is an example:

Parent: “Our rule is that you tidy your bedroom on a Saturday morning”,

Child: “But he didn’t tidy his bedroom either!”

Parent: “I understand that and I’ll speak to him next, the rule is that you too tidy your bedroom on a Saturday morning”.

Child: “you’re always picking on me!”

Parent: “I understand that you are annoyed with me and we can discuss that later if you like. Right now, I need you to tidy your bedroom, thank you.”

By the third instruction, most children will see we are being firm and will comply. So it is best to end by thanking them and then praise for when the task is complete. However, if our young person still argues or refuses, we can move to a consequence. It is important that we stay calm, choose a consequence that is manageable and not too drastic. For example, “I would rather you did not lose 10c of your pocket money, so I need you to tidy your room, thank you.” Making it seem as though you don’t want to implement this consequence is better than something that sounds more threatening such as “Tidy up or you’ll lose 10c of your pocket money.” Children can feel as though both parties have something to gain from completing the task.

Try to allow them time in between each instruction to change their mind and complete the task. Once the task has been completed, it is important to thank and to praise and not to comment any further on the task as it is helpful to end the interaction positively.

If the consequence has to be implemented, try to do so calmly and matter-of-factly. It is important to follow through on the consequences if they are mentioned and so the child learns to pay attention to the instruction as they know the consequence will come. Try to do the above as privately as possible to reduce the potential embarrassment and/or defensiveness your child might experience if this happens in front of others.

This article was contributed by Katie McClean, Assistant Psychologist with HSE Primary Care Child and Family Psychology Services and a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations. For more information on this and other topics go to www.loveparenting.ie.

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