Recycle right: Castletroy College students to hold electrical waste drop off day

Donal O’Regan

Reporter:

Donal O’Regan

RTE’s Peadar King with Aifric Nevin, Sofia Brennan Vacas, Azeezat Adedamola Muniru, Zofia Frasonska, Nelly Annick Frohburg

RTE’s Peadar King with Aifric Nevin, Sofia Brennan Vacas, Azeezat Adedamola Muniru, Zofia Frasonska, Nelly Annick Frohburg

IT’S NORMALLY only teenagers that are dropped off at Castletroy College but on Saturday you can drop off your electrical waste.

It is being organised by 200 second year students. They are asking the entire Monaleen/Castletroy and wider community to bring any household electrical items for recycling this Saturday, March 2 from 10am to 4pm. It is part of a project on sustainability in technology, entitled e-mining.

“Please support us, second year students, as we take action to raise awareness of the issue of critical raw materials,” they say.

They have spent weeks researching and building up to Saturday. Peadar King, producer and presenter of the RTÉ global affairs series What In The World, visited the school earlier this month. He discussed our current use of technology, the conditions in mines where the raw materials needed for our technology are extracted before showing the short documentary, Digital Dumping in Ghana. This documentary explores the terrible conditions in which electronic waste is recycled in the infamous Agbogloshie dump in Accra.

The pupils have also received talks from geologists, Dell employees and European Recycling Platform. The project is an interdisciplinary unit of work where second year students are studying the three pillars of sustainability, economic, environmental and social across five different subject areas over a period of four weeks.

Teacher in science, geography, business, CSPE and metalwork classes have designed this integrated unit as part of a pilot project under the guidance of the inspectorate in the department of education and science. The purpose of this design is to give students a broader, more integrated and enhanced learning experience.

Lisa Kiely, physics teacher, said: “All 200 of our second years have been involved in this project and various classes have taken on different roles in marketing our event and developing awareness of the issue of critical raw materials both inside the school and across the wider community.” A research team from UL will also be running a reuse research project.

So call down to Castletroy College on Saturday and support these environmentally conscious students by dropping off everything from washing machines to toasters to computer monitors to batteries and much more.