Spring of 'hope in uncertain times' at return of Limerick festival

Fintan Walsh

Reporter:

Fintan Walsh

Niall O'Callaghan, Shannon Heritage, with Limerick Spring’s Robbie Gannon, Ms Moroney-Ward, Emer Casey, Pa O'Brien, Kate O'Shea

Niall O'Callaghan, Shannon Heritage, with Limerick Spring’s Robbie Gannon, Ms Moroney-Ward, Emer Casey, Pa O'Brien, Kate O'Shea

CAN a cohort of students conceptualise an ideal nation? Can children set the tone with redesigns of the city? And can local citizens generate breakthrough ideas for the Liveable Limerick initiative?

These will be some of many concepts explored at the popular Limerick Spring Festival, which returns to the city next month, following a one-year hiatus.

Following the advent of national discussions on housing and health, and the global discourses in the aftermath of Donald Trump’s election, the theme of this year’s Spring festival is “Hope in Uncertain Times”.

The festival takes place from February 19 to 24. 

“Each effort, however small, changes the society we live in. These changes may seem trivial to us now, but as history shows us, nothing stays the same, and we and our actions are all part of that longer-term story of the ups and downs of human progress.”

A discussion with journalist and broadcaster Vincent Browne at King John’s Castle will act as one of the headline events during the week-long itinerary.

The event, which takes place on February 23, will be hosted by Kathryn Hayes, UL School of Journalism. 

The festival is working with the Limerick Literary Festival to bring a discussion event with the Rubberbandits’ Blindboy Boatclub and author Kevin Barry at Dolan’s on February 24. 

Ms Moroney-Ward said that the purpose of the festival “is to get as many people participating in the festival as possible”.

“The whole idea is to increase participation and to get more young people involved and older people involved, and to have that wider age spectrum. And to look at what is already happening on the ground in Limerick. There is already loads of people doing great projects and lots of great activity, and it’s really about celebrating that rather than bringing in huge names and spending lots of money. So, how can we celebrate the actual activity of the city?”

For more information, visit www.limerickspring.com.