Limerick Lace showcased as part of National Heritage Week

Martin Mongan

Reporter:

Martin Mongan

Email:

martin.mongan@limerickleader.ie

Limerick Lace showcased as part of National Heritage Week

Former Mayor of Limerick, Cllr Michael Sheahan and Dr Matthew Potter, Limerick Museum curator looking over the recently acquired Limerick lace shawl belonging to Kitty Kiernan

THE Department of Heritage, Culture and the Gaeltacht has listed Limerick Lace as one of 18 projects that it will showcase during National Heritage Week.

The week long celebration began at the weekend and will run until this Sunday, August 23.

The Department has engaged with practitioners on projects to highlight and raise awareness of some of the diverse practices that are part of Ireland’s rich tapestry of cultural heritage.

Catherine Martine, the Minister for Media, Tourism, Arts, Culture, Sport and the Gaeltacht has welcomed the initiative:

“Our living heritage is an integral part of our culture and initiatives such as this help to showcase our traditions, skills and practices and support their safeguarding for future generations. I wish to thank those who have taken part in our open call for intangible cultural heritage projects and encourage everyone to participate in National Heritage Week 2020 as the vast array of projects featured over the course of the week ensures that there is something to interest everyone.”

Limerick Lace is the most famous of all Irish laces. Established in 1829, it has been worn by thousands of women, including Queen Victoria, American First Lady Edith Roosevelt and Countess Markievicz.

Limerick Lace comes in two forms: Tambour, which is sewn onto a net stretched onto a frame with a crochet-like hook, and needle run, which is embroidered with a needle onto the net backing.

Creating Limerick Lace was the main source of income for many women and girls during the famine and funded many journeys to the US for a fresh start.