Hosepipe ban extended in Limerick as water supplies remain ‘lower than normal’

Maria Flannery

Reporter:

Maria Flannery

Hosepipe ban extended in Limerick as water supplies remain ‘lower than normal’

IRISH Water has extended the hosepipe ban across Limerick until the end of September.

The ban, which began in early July, aims to conserve water after a prolonged dry spell left the country in drought.

The ban on using a hose has been extended for a third month in a total of 16 counties, including Limerick. The ban will be lifted this weekend in Clare, due to increased rainfall further north of the country.

Irish Water said that it is appealing to customers to continue to save water, as raw supplies in rivers, lakes and groundwater remain lower than normal.

The conservation efforts that have been made in the last number of months are “helping” to restore the water supply, but further conservation is needed.

“Irish Water is continuing to manage scarce resources in these areas with the local authorities and specialist contractors doing everything practical to reduce leaks, manage demands and maintain continuity of supply,” said a spokesperson for Irish Water.

“Emergency work on upgrading borehole pumping plants, introducing new boreholes in some areas and deploying temporary weirs at critical river intakes are helping to maximise water available in these southern counties.”

This Monday, Irish Water appealed to Limerick customers to conserve water by taking these steps in the home.

It said that interruptions to the water service are to be expected in the coming weeks, as the water company works to bring new water supplies on stream.

And “unprecedented ground conditions” are causing ground shrinkage and leading to “an increased frequency of pipe bursts”, according to Irish Water.

“Areas where water supplies are under pressure at this time include Hospital, Oola, Pallasgreen, Doon, Murroe and Knocklong in the eastern part of the county and Glin and Castlemahon in west Limerick.

“We are also monitoring water levels in the Deel and the Feale which have been dropping. Areas supplied by these rivers and their tributaries include Newcastle West, Abbeyfeale and Askeaton.”