LISTEN: Mother acquires sepsis a second time at University Hospital Limerick

Fintan Walsh, Health Correspondent

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Fintan Walsh, Health Correspondent

Email:

fintan.walsh@limerickleader.ie

LISTEN: Mother acquires sepsis a second time at University Hospital Limerick

A PARTEEN woman who recently had her bowel surgically removed has acquired sepsis for a second time at University Hospital Limerick, and is now being treated in a high dependency unit as a result. 

Sinead Johnson, a Parteen native who resides in Ballybunion, Co Kerry, contacted Joe Duffy on RTE One’s Liveline on Friday over warm conditions at UHL during the hottest heatwave in more than 40 years. 

She told RTE that she went six nights without sleep as it was too hot, and called for a portable or mobile air conditioning to be installed in the ward 1C.

Kelly’s Refrigeration and Engineering installed the air conditioning on Friday after hearing her during the radio interview. 

On Tuesday, Sinead’s son Ciaran, a 22-year-old nursing student in Tralee, told RTE that he feels she looks like she is dying and is concerned for her health. 

In a statement this Tuesday, UL Hospitals Group said it is experiencing a significant increase in the numbers of emergency and trauma cases presenting.

“This high volume which we are experiencing is uncharacteristic for time of year. Patients on emergency/trauma lists are prioritised based on clinical decision making and chronological order. At times of high demand on emergency/trauma procedures, the hospital group does seek to maximise alternative location for trauma procedures to be performed in a safe and efficient manner.

“To meet with the significant demand, UHL has put on additional surgical lists and surgeons have been redeployed from Croom Orthopaedic Hospital to University Hospital Limerick to manage the additional trauma cases.”

The UL Hospitals Group spokesperson said it endeavours to limit unnecessary fasting.

 “Management is acutely conscious of the discomfort the hot weather is causing our patients and staff. Like many acute hospitals in Ireland, much of the inpatient accommodation in the hospital is located on outdated nightingale wards without modern air conditioning.

“Hydration rounds have been doubled in frequency in recent days to ensure patients are getting enough water and every effort is being made to ensure unnecessary fasting is kept to a minimum.”