Peter McVerry Trust hits Limerick target in first year of operation

Fintan Walsh

Reporter:

Fintan Walsh

Peter McVerry Trust CEO Pat Doyle with Deputy Maurice Quinlivan and Deputy Jan O’Sullivan at the O’Connell Street office

Peter McVerry Trust CEO Pat Doyle with Deputy Maurice Quinlivan and Deputy Jan O’Sullivan at the O’Connell Street office

THE PETER McVerry Trust has exceeded its goal in housing 30 people since opening its Limerick city offices 12 months ago.

The national homeless and charity service, which provides long-term accommodation to people seriously affected by the homeless crisis, launched its O’Connell Street service in late 2016. 

The service works directly with Limerick City and County Council to provide housing and supports for those exiting homelessness.

Peter McVerry Trust CEO, Pat Doyle praised the charity for reaching its target in its inaugural year in Limerick.

“When we began providing housing and housing supports in Limerick last December our goal was to deliver homes for 30 people. We have now exceeded that number and have provided homes to individuals, couples and families in Limerick in the last 12 months.

“Our goal now is to ensure that we continue to work to increase housing options for people in Limerick so that we can continue to work with the City and County Councils to secure as many exits as possible out of homelessness in 2018,” Mr Doyle stated. 

And to mark its first year in Limerick, the charity launched a video campaign in which members of the public shared their concerns over the local homeless crisis.

The people of Limerick were asked in the vox-pop: “What do you think of the homeless crisis?”

One woman responded: “I think it’s dreadfully sad. One doesn’t know what to do, really. It’s very sad. They are all ages.”

One man said: “I see it in the mornings when I’m coming in. There’s a lot of people on the street. There could be eight, to 10, or 12, just out on O’Connell Street. That’s between four, five, or six in the morning. And it is increasing.”

A young man said: “Even if you go out to Shannon Banks in the mornings at half six, you’ll see. My dad knows a man who used to work for Bank of Ireland, and he lost his job and he fell on hard times and he’s living in a tent up the road. It’s an absolute joke.”