Limerick dog owners warned to keep pets tied after new poisoning case

Donal O'Regan

Reporter:

Donal O'Regan

The sign that had been erected in Clonlara earlier in the year

The sign that had been erected in Clonlara earlier in the year

PET owners are being warned to take care after a dog was killed during a new outbreak of poison being put down in County Limerick.

The canine died in the last two weeks in Caherconlish.

In February, John O’Dwyer, city centre based vet, issued a public warning after seeing three pets die from a concentrated mixture of strychnine and rat poison in the previous eight weeks.

“Just be careful if walking your dog in the Clonlara / Castleconnell area. There is still someone putting poison down on the public walks there. It has been impossible to save any that have come in to us.

“If anyone has any suspicion as to who is doing this please contact your local garda station. This person needs to be caught,” said John, who stresses that these are not people walking their dogs through farmers’ fields but on public walkways. One of the owners of the dogs erected signs, pictured.

It has new emerged there is a similar case in Caherconlish.

According to a local source, there have been reports of packs of dogs following cattle and calves in the locality.

“Farmers are entitled to protect their stock but laying poison in this manner is illegal and it is a terrible way for an animal to die. There is also a risk that a child might pick it up.

“It is also a warning to owners not to let their dogs roam and to keep them on a leash if they are going for a walk. We don’t want to see anymore of this happening or a number of deaths like there was in Clonlara/Castleconnell.

”Some dogs deserve to be put down as they chase for fun and they get a taste for it. There is a proper legal way to euthanise a dog worrying animals such as calling in a veterinary surgeon. Nobody wants to see a family pet being taken for a walk, eat poison and die. It is a terrible slow death with convulsions,” they said.

In June, after a number of dog attacks across the country the IFA said owners can be held responsible for any losses involved in dog attacks, with serious financial and legal consequences.

“Farmers have a right to protect their sheep flock and can shoot a dog worrying, or about to worry their flock,” said a spokesperson.

The organisation reminded dog owners that they have an obligation to keep their pets under control at all times. It is a legal requirement that all dog owners microchip and register their canines.

“We hope this is the last we see of it in Caherconlish,” said the local.