Scottish soccer player apologises for comments about Limerick

Donal O'Regan

Reporter:

Donal O'Regan

Scottish soccer player apologises for comments about Limerick

The convent in Bruff which is now home to Limerick FC

A FORMER Dundee United soccer player, who lived in Bruff during a brief spell with Limerick FC, has apologised for comments made in a Scottish newspaper.

Jordan Moore is quoted as saying in The Herald Scotland: "Limerick is known as Stab City. I stayed in a village called Bruff, about 30km from the city, and on every second lamppost there is a horse tied up. There must be 20 horses in every street you walk down. But if you tried to cut the horses loose they would kill you – supposedly.

“One day the police came and moved all the horses away. The next day it turned out the guys who owned the horses had smashed up every shop and put all their cows in the actual shops and the schools as well. This is true. It was crazy,” Mr Moore apparently said at a recent press conference.

“The farmers who had cows in their fields also put them in the shops, the Spars and supermarkets, for revenge. The police gave them all the horses back and told them to watch what they were doing.”

The 22-year-old, who spent three months with Limerick FC and who successfully fought skin cancer over the last two years, also spoke about IRA threats, being haunted by a nun and the "sound of scraping on the walls inside the room" in the article.

He also said: “One day the police came and moved all the horses away. The next day it turned out the guys who owned the horses had smashed up every shop and put all their cows in the actual shops and the schools as well. This is true. It was crazy.

“The farmers who had cows in their fields also put them in the shops, the Spars and supermarkets, for revenge. The police gave them all the horses back and told them to watch what they were doing.”

Mr Moore has since apologised on Twitter: "My comments in today's newspapers have been taken out of context and I apologise profusely for any distress caused."

In an email to Limerick FC, he said: "I am writing to apologise unreservedly for any distress I may have been caused by the coverage in today’s newspapers. It was completely unintentional.

"My comments have been taken out of context and sensationalised, particularly about the town of Bruff. The people in the town were extremely nice to me during my time there and I am sorry for any offence and distress I have caused.

"I have been a bit naïve and it is a harsh lesson learned for me."

The journalist who interviewed Mr Moore, Neil Cameron, tweeted: "I stand by the interview – repeated in other newspapers – but it is absolutely right people get the right to reply."

The article has caused consternation in Bruff at the ludicrous description of the picturesque village.

Local councillor, Bill O'Donnell, said: "If it wasn't so derogatory it would be comical."

Donal Thurlow, chair of the Sean Wall committee and director of Bloomsday in Bruff which takes place this Thursday, said: It is so inaccurate as to be laughable but it will do much damage to the reputation of this fine town.

“Bruff is a wonderful town, and residents and visitors will not recognise the description of the town in the article.

“As a community we will respond in due course, but in the meantime we would be delighted to welcome the journalist, Neil Cameron to come and visit us and write an accurate article."

A spokesperson for Limerick City and County Council said: "We have had contact with representatives for Jordan and have also received the email he sent to Limerick FC Chairman Pat O’Sullivan apologising for the article.

"We accept this apology and welcome, in particular, the clarification that the people of Bruff were extremely nice to him during his time there. 

"This is what we have come to know and expect of Bruff, which is a very hospitable and welcoming town and anything but what was portrayed in the article, which Jordan now clearly states was unintentional.”

Limerick FC issued a statement late on Tuesday to say it was "aware of comments attributed to former player Jordan Moore in a newspaper article today in relation to his time at the club and the town of Bruff".

"Limerick FC are hurt, angered and dumbfounded by these comments which we totally and utterly refute. We are aware that the community of Bruff has been left understandably distressed by the said article," it says in the statement.

"A representative for Jordan Moore contacted the club earlier this year and informed us of Jordan’s background and his recovery from cancer. As a community-driven club, we offered Jordan a short-term deal to assist in his rehabilitation and provided him with accommodation and remuneration.

"Jordan spent a week at the club after which he decided to take up our offer. Initially it was agreed that Jordan would stay for four weeks but at his request this was extended. Jordan recently returned to Scotland and had thanked the club for their help during his stay here.

"The club, our staff and players have been welcomed with open arms by the community of Bruff and have been treated tremendously.

"The club this afternoon received an apology from Jordan Moore in which he states the comments are “taken out of context and sensationalised”. We find it very difficult to accept the apology at this time.

"The club will be making no further comment as we seek further advice."