University Hospital Limerick radiology staff highlight importance of cardiac imaging 

Fintan Walsh, Health Correspondent

Reporter:

Fintan Walsh, Health Correspondent

Marking International Day of Radiology at UHL were Student Radiographers Sorcha Meehan and Thomas Forde, and Consultant Radiologists Dr Julie O’Brien and Dr Tim Scanlon

Marking International Day of Radiology at UHL were Student Radiographers Sorcha Meehan and Thomas Forde, and Consultant Radiologists Dr Julie O’Brien and Dr Tim Scanlon

STAFF at University Hospital Limerick have celebrated International Day of Radiology by highlighting the importance of cardiac imaging for assessing and managing heart patients in the region.

This global event is marked annually on the anniversary of Wilhelm Rontgen’s discovery of the X-Ray in 1885. 

A large proportion of diagnosis and follow-up depends on radiology, which includes x-rays, ultrasound, CT and MRI scans as well as interventional procedures and nuclear medicine studies. At UHL the Radiology team comprises specialist doctors or radiologists, radiographers, nurses, medical physicists, healthcare assistants and administrative staff.

This year’s theme for International Day of Radiology 2018 was cardiac imaging, which has highlighted the increasingly important role of radiology in cardiac care, contributing to the diagnosis, pre-procedural work-up and follow-up of patients with a wide variety of cardiac pathology, from coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease to defects in the size and shape of the heart.

Dr Tim Scanlon, consultant radiologist, University Hospital Limerick, said the most recent addition to cardiac imaging services at UHL was CCTA (Coronary CT Angiography). He said this non-invasive examination is a “positive development”. 

Dr Julie O’Brien, consultant radiologist, who is the current chairperson of the cardiac imaging subcommittee of the faculty of radiologists in Ireland, said radiologists can play a role in managing patients with cardiac conditions.

“Our experience with imaging techniques and knowledge of anatomy is invaluable in the interpretation of the findings, however, this needs to be integrated with clinical information from our cardiology colleagues to provide the correct diagnosis and facilitate optimal patient outcomes.”