March 7: Curraghchase House should be preserved

The need to preserve Curraghchase house Further to my letter published in the Limerick Leader at the end of November last concerning the continuing deterioration of the manor house fabric at Curraghchase, I have received many e-mails of support from readers in the Limerick area and as far away as America and an Irish person living here in Australia!

The need to preserve Curraghchase house

Further to my letter published in the Limerick Leader at the end of November last concerning the continuing deterioration of the manor house fabric at Curraghchase, I have received many e-mails of support from readers in the Limerick area and as far away as America and an Irish person living here in Australia!

An aerial photograph of the house clearly showing the extensive internal tree and weed growth. The respondents have generously provided an amazing amount of relevant information and historical research which I could not have sourced. The manor house can now be identified as having been constructed in two distinct stages. The segment on the left of the ‘entry’ steps was built firstly in the late 1700s and three Irish architects are credited for this three-level structure.

They would have been very progressive designers at that period and deserve enormous respect. In about 1825 the then owner, Sir Aubrey deVere Hunt, appointed English architect Amon Henry Wilds to design extensions to the original house and that skeleton building shape is what remains today. Fortunately, to Wilds’ great credit, he respected the design theme of the original architects’ work and repeated the elevational treatment for his extensions. He did, very sympathetically, include some elements of his own including some curved elements externally and internally.

Coillte are the nominated caretakers of the estate. No progress on a rescue plan of the manor house can proceed without their approval. It would be of great assistance if they would urgently consider allowing professional experts to carefully document and record the existing structure, followed up by careful restoration work in progressive stages. Limerick people deserve that this historic building is preserved for future generations.

henry hayes

australia

EMAIL: henryhayes1@optusnet.com.au

Further to my letter published in the Limerick Leader at the end of November last concerning the continuing deterioration of the manor house fabric at Curraghchase, I have received many e-mails of support from readers in the Limerick area and as far away as America and an Irish person living here in Australia!

An aerial photograph of the house clearly showing the extensive internal tree and weed growth. The respondents have generously provided an amazing amount of relevant information and historical research which I could not have sourced. The manor house can now be identified as having been constructed in two distinct stages. The segment on the left of the ‘entry’ steps was built firstly in the late 1700s and three Irish architects are credited for this three-level structure.

They would have been very progressive designers at that period and deserve enormous respect. In about 1825 the then owner, Sir Aubrey deVere Hunt, appointed English architect Amon Henry Wilds to design extensions to the original house and that skeleton building shape is what remains today. Fortunately, to Wilds’ great credit, he respected the design theme of the original architects’ work and repeated the elevational treatment for his extensions. He did, very sympathetically, include some elements of his own including some curved elements externally and internally.

Coillte are the nominated caretakers of the estate. No progress on a rescue plan of the manor house can proceed without their approval. It would be of great assistance if they would urgently consider allowing professional experts to carefully document and record the existing structure, followed up by careful restoration work in progressive stages. Limerick people deserve that this historic building is preserved for future generations.

henry hayes

australia

EMAIL: henryhayes1@optusnet.com.au

Amateur cast put on a brilliant show

I went to the opening night of the Torch Players’ production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. What a play, what a cast – it was absolutely fabulous. For an amateur production it was really professional. Never did people look as mad!

The set also was incredible, even down to the detail of swinging hospital doors and three steps up to a fantastic nurse station. Well done to the Torch Players – think you deserve an Oscar!

I believe it’s going to the people of Kilmallock next. Enjoy!

Michael holland

Parteen, Co clare

Shatter has it right on fathers’ access

Alan Shatter has highlighted one of the great abuses of our time where mothers use a broken justice system to deprive fathers of access to their children.

Though not affected by this, at least not directly, I find it reassuring that somebody with whom I fundamentally disagree on issues such as marriage and adoption can exercise a humane leadership on this question. It is noteworthy that women’s leaders have remained strangely silent on this deprivation of fathers, apparently content to preside over an era of new injustices for the innocent brothers, uncles and sons of so many.

Where changes relating to adoption and marriage are concerned, is it too much to hope that the rational approach will now begin to replace the bandwagon for ‘change’ that dominates discussions presently?

Alan Shatter’s intervention, so welcome to those of us who wish to fix what is broken in society rather than preside over its further fragmentation, is additionally welcome as a powerful case for parliamentary initiative over the odious whip system.

But the media should now follow suit and step off the bandwagon of change at any price. Permit the critique of what is proposed on marriage and adoption rather than recycle the absurdities we have had to endure in recent weeks.

Gerald O’Carroll

Huntsfield, Dooradoyle, Limerick

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