October 28: Picture from book took me right back

Another remarkable picture from the new book, Limerick Through The Lens: Pictures from the Limerick Leader Archive. These men built the Castleconnell Peat Factory in 1904 and they were there 50 years later to mark the anniversary. Back row, from left: Martin Kelly, Jack Kelly, Thomas Joyce (Coolriree) and Thomas Joyce (Castleconnell). Front row, from left: William Tucker, Martin OSullivan and Malachy Ryan
ONE of the photographs in the Leader last week, which was taken from your new book of photographs (Limerick Through The Lens), certainly brought me back in time. It took me back to 1963 to be precise, when many thousands of members of the local farming community arrived en masse in Limerick, up near the The Crescent and the monument of Daniel O’Connell. I was one of the protesters included in the photograph and you could have knocked me down with a feather when I saw it after more than 50 years. I had no idea that such a photograph existed.

ONE of the photographs in the Leader last week, which was taken from your new book of photographs (Limerick Through The Lens), certainly brought me back in time. It took me back to 1963 to be precise, when many thousands of members of the local farming community arrived en masse in Limerick, up near the The Crescent and the monument of Daniel O’Connell. I was one of the protesters included in the photograph and you could have knocked me down with a feather when I saw it after more than 50 years. I had no idea that such a photograph existed.

Alongside me in the picture was my late father, who had a small farm at that time. It was felt in our family that I would take over the farm, when I was of suitable age and when he was ready to retire, but as it turned out I decided the farming life was not for me. I subsequently left my native county to find opportunities that weren’t available to me at the time. I’m in my early seventies now, but I have never lost interest in reading about the latest news and I get the Leader every week.

Looking at that picture, I wonder what became of the mostly men who felt so strongly about their situation that they took the the streets with their placards. It was another 10 years, nearly, before we joined the Common Market and times were tough back then. I am delighted that this picture has been preserved and I look forward to getting the book in which it features. Congratulations to the Leader on your 125th anniversary and I hope you go on to have another 125 years and more!

MICHAEL DEASY

KNOCKLYON, DUBLIN 16