Limerick man threatened to 'wreck' mother in law's house while brandishing block

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

The man pleaded guilty at Limerick District Court to charges relating to an incident that happened in the early hours of November 22

The man pleaded guilty at Limerick District Court to charges relating to an incident that happened in the early hours of November 22

A JUDGE has described as ‘reprehensible’ the actions of a Limerick man who threatened to wreck his mother-in-law’s home while brandishing a concrete block outside.

Thomas O’Donoghue, aged 46, who has an address at St Michael’s Court, Watergate, pleaded guilty to charges relating to an incident which happened in the early hours of November 22, last.

Inspector Helen Costelloe told Limerick District Court the defendant had presented at the house which in the city centre at around 12.45am and that he entered the back garden without permission.

She said he had an argument with his partner earlier in the day and that he was brandishing a concrete block while standing in the back garden.

The defendant, she added, was shouting and roaring and at one point threatened the occupants that he would “wreck the place”.

Gardai were alerted and when they attended they found a shoe print on the back door of the property.

The defendant, who was identified as being the culprit, made admissions following his arrest a short time later.

Solicitor John Herbert said his client’s relationship was going through a “rocky period” around the time and that an argument had taken place between him and his partner earlier in the day.

“Things were said that should not have been said and he went drinking. He then presented himself at the house,” he said adding that he was “known at the house”. 

Mr Herbert said the comments exchanged during the argument had gotten “very very personal” and that things got worse when his client went drinking.

Judge Marie Keane was told the couple have two children together and that there have been no further difficulties between them since.

“He admitted everything, he realised he was in the wrong,” said Mr Herbert who added that Mr O’Donoghe has given up alcohol and no longer drinks.

“He has addressed his underlying issue,” he told the court.

After formally convicting the defendant of the charge, Judge Keane commented that his actions on the night had put the occupants of the house in fear and were reprehensible.

After imposing a €250 fine under the provisions of the Public Order Act, Judge Keane told Mr Herbert his client was “a bit long in the tooth for this carry on”.