UL lecturer is key man on climate change report

Alan Owens

Reporter:

Alan Owens

A LECTURER in UL’s Department of Life Sciences has been selected as a lead author on a major new report commissioned by one of the world’s leading international organisations asessing climate change.

A LECTURER in UL’s Department of Life Sciences has been selected as a lead author on a major new report commissioned by one of the world’s leading international organisations asessing climate change.

Dr Ken Byrne, a lecturer in UL since 2008, has been selected as a lead author of a major wetlands report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a body tasked with reviewing and analysing new information regarding climate change.

The prestigious invitation arose after a competitive application process and Dr Byrne will travel to Hayama, Japan, on November 1 to meet with fellow authors and commence work on the report, which is due for completion in 2013.

The report is entitled ‘Supplement to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories: Wetlands’ and the UL lecturer said he was “delighted to have been selected as it allows me work closely with other members of the international scientific community on issues that have direct relevance to climate change policy”.

Dr Byrne’s research focuses on greenhouse gas balances and carbon sequestration in land use systems and he has previously contributed to two IPCC reports. He was also a member of the IPCC team that shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore in 2007.

Speaking about the report he said: “Wetlands, including peatlands, are a key component of the global carbon balance, storing vast amounts of carbon and playing an important role in the biosphere atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases”.

“This IPCC work will draw on the latest research findings to develop methods for the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and removals in wetlands under a range of uses including restoration and rewetting,” he explained.

The IPCC was established in 1988 by the UN Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organisation.