Jury told Limerick murder accused went to victim’s home armed with knife

Natasha Reid

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Natasha Reid

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news@limerickleader.ie

Jury told Limerick murder accused went to victim’s home armed with knife

The scene of the fatal stabbing at Roches Row

A LIMERICK man who is accused of murdering a Romanian man in the city last year, told gardai that ‘if he had stopped f***ing annoying me, it wouldn’t have happened’.

Desmond Coyle, aged 60, who is originally from Garryowen but who was living at Davis Street, had explained that he had gone to the man’s house with a knife to ‘stop him demanding money’ off him.

He has pleaded not guilty to murdering Calo Carpaci, 58, at Roche’s Row (between Roches Street and Thomas Street) on May 24, 2017.

In evidence at the Central Criminal Court this Tuesday, Detective Garda David Baynham told Lily Buckley BL, prosecuting, that he had interviewed the accused following the fatal stabbing.

He testified that Mr Coyle had said he’d gone there that day to ‘stop him demanding money off me’ and ‘making smart-alecky comments’.

However, he said that he didn’t remember going there or bringing the knife, but that he must have. He did not know why he had chosen that particular day.

“He opened the door and came out very fast. That’s all I remember,” he said. “He had fallen down and was bleeding.”

He was asked why.

“Because the knife obviously went into him,’ he replied. “I had the knife in my hand. I don’t know if he came onto it or I put it in him.”

It was put to him that the reality was that, if he hadn’t gone there with the knife, the man would still be alive.

“I understand,” he replied. “I know the reality is that if he had stopped f***ing annoying me, it wouldn’t have happened either.”

The jury has also heard from Deputy State Pathologist Dr Michael Curtis. He said he had carried out the post-mortem exam on the deceased.

He gave the cause of his death as a single stab wound to the chest, which had penetrated and gone all the way through the heart.

The trial continues before Mr Justice Michael White and a jury of seven men and five women.