Significant reduction of Covid-19 cases in Limerick following apparent reclassification

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Email:

david.hurley@limerickleader.ie

BREAKING: Significant reduction of Covid-19 cases in Limerick following apparent reclassification

There are now 594 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Limerick

THE number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Limerick has dropped below 600 following what appears to have been a second major reclassification of cases which were detected in Clare.

According to the latest figures, published this Bank Holiday Monday, the number of confirmed cases of the disease in Limerick now stands at 594.

This represents a 5% reduction on the figure of 629 which was released by the Department of Health on Sunday.

Monday’s figures also show there has been a significant increase in the number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 in County Clare (from 323 to 360).

This suggests that some cases of the disease which had been attributed to Limerick were, in fact, detected in County Clare.

While it’s not known when the reclassified cases were detected, the last time that there were less than 600 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Limerick was on May 15.

Previously – on May 7 – the number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 fell from 591 to 574 following a reclassification process relating to address in Clare.

In reply to a query from the Limerick Leader, a spokesperson for the Department of Health said: "The Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) has advised that in the process of validating data and reviewing addresses, cases may be reassigned to another county.  It is also possible for cases to be denotified so it is important not to draw inferences from statistically small changes in data that is constantly undergoing validation."

Separately, the National Public Health Emergency Team has been notified of 77 new confirmed cases and one additional Covid-19 related death in Ireland.

The total number of cases now stands at 25,062 while there have been 1,650 deaths.

Dr Tony Holohan, Chief Medical Officer in the Department of Health, is appealing to people to abide by the public health restrictions.

“As restrictions ease and we begin to resume social and economic life, we must do all we can to prevent a second wave. It is vital that we continue to practice hand and cough hygiene and social distancing, with the additional hygiene measure of face coverings in appropriate settings. It is important to give space to our vulnerable people when out and about. We must continue to do all we can to interrupt the spread of this virus,” he said.