From picking fruit in Oz to taking photos in Limerick - Marie Keating

Donal O'Regan

Reporter:

Donal O'Regan

Email:

news@limerickleader.ie

MARIE Keating has loved photography since she was a little girl growing up in Killeedy but fruit picking in Australia pushed her towards a career in it.
“We got paid by how many oranges we picked, and to be fair, I was pretty terrible at it! So I spent my days off with the free entertainment of the local library where they just happened to have a very good selection of books on photography.
“Later on, the Irish Echo newspaper would give me some work taking photos of the GAA games in Sydney and photography as a career took off from there,” said Marie.
Early influences were her mother who had a video camera and her grandmother who painted.
“I do remember getting a disposable camera one summer from my parents shop in Raheenagh and running after my next-door neighbours, taking snapshots like the paparazzi! One of them must have forgiven me anyway as 25 years later he asked me to take the photos for his wedding,” smiled Marie.
Her love of photography was in the background for a long time as all her focus was on sport.
After attending Scoil Íde Naofa, Raheenagh and Scoil Mhuire & Íde, Newcastle West, she attended LIT where she studied Business and Marketing. Marie got a job as an accounts clerk at AIBP in Rathkeale.
“At the end of 2005 I got a notion to go to Australia for what I thought would just be a few months but five years later I returned home with a better tan, a mad love of Aussie Rules and an Associate Degree in Photography.”
The one question we have asked all participants in this series is what makes a good photographer?
“For me you’d have to ask Ernst Haas or Diane Arbus! In a way the challenge of photography is that it is a discipline with so many opposing parts that nobody could ever be good at all of them. Sometimes you have to be upbeat and outgoing with people and other times you have to go about unnoticed and discreetly. Sometimes you have to observe and anticipate the photo and other times you have to create the photo.
“Some people will look to accurately reproduce a scene and others try to make a known scene new. You have to narrow your focus to deal with the technicalities and widen it again to see the bigger picture.
“For weddings and press photography all of these usually occur in the same shoot,” said Marie, who has been reading a lot of The Artist’s Way recently and refers to a lovely quote in it: “The purpose of art is not a rarified, intellectual distillate - it is life, intensified, brilliant life” - Alain Arias-Misson.
“I suppose if you can intensify life through any one of your photos, that’s pretty good,” concluded Marie.
See http://www.mariekeatingphotography.com/ for more.