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‘Evocative’ images of Limerick city in a different era

Gerry Andrews at the opening of his Dublin exhibition in the National Photographic Archive in Temple Bar. Picture: Marc O'Sullivan

Gerry Andrews at the opening of his Dublin exhibition in the National Photographic Archive in Temple Bar. Picture: Marc O'Sullivan

  • by Anne Sheridan
 

‘COMPELLING, evocative and stunning’ is how the National Photographic Archive has described the body of work of Limerick photographer Gerry Andrews.

The National Library of Ireland (NLI)’s National Photographic Archive has officially launched ‘Shaped by History’, an exhibition of images taken at Limerick’s Milk Market in the 1970s by award winning social documentary photographer from Wolfe Tone Street.

The exhibition consists of 95 black and white portrait photographs, some of which measure seven feet high, of the community of merchants, traders, children and characters of Limerick’s historic quarter, taken between 1971 and 1978.

The exhibition, launched in the National Photographic Archive in Dublin’s Temple Bar, is the only Limerick of City of Culture event taking place outside the city of Limerick.

A set of the prints will also be donated to the National Library of Ireland’s photographic collection, home to the world’s largest collection of photographs relating to Ireland.

Elizabeth Kirwan, curator of the NLI’s National Photographic Archive, said they were thrilled that this exhibition was made possible through collaboration with the Hunt Museum and through the hard work and dedication of Gerry Andrews himself.

“The ‘Shaped by History’ exhibition is stunning, evocative and challenging, and documents the period in Irish history, just as the Shannon region began to transform into a national and international model for development. Gerry Andrews has captured compelling moments of a very different Ireland to the one we know today, and the photographs will take their rightful place in the NLI’s collection of photographs documenting Irish life,” said Ms Kirwan.

Opened by another Limerickman, Riverdance composer Bill Whelan, the exhibition will run until January 4. It is open seven days a week and is free to the public to view.

 

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