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Arts Council bring major collection to Limerick

Viewing gallery: Pat Moylan, chairman of The Arts Council, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Mr Jimmy Deenihan and Orlaith McBride, director of the Arts Council inspecting some of the works on loan. Picture: Brian Gavin/Press 22

Viewing gallery: Pat Moylan, chairman of The Arts Council, Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Mr Jimmy Deenihan and Orlaith McBride, director of the Arts Council inspecting some of the works on loan. Picture: Brian Gavin/Press 22

  • by Alan Owens
 

LIMERICK artist Emmet Kierans was commissioned by the Arts Council of Ireland to create a piece for the major exhibition Into The Light which opened in Limerick City Gallery last Thursday.

Kierans’ quite stunning Observer Effect - a mixed media piece on MDF board - stands out favourably among the 66 other pieces loaned by the Arts Council to LCGA from its permanent collection, part of a major series of exhibitions taking place around the country to mark 60 years of the state body.

The artist, now based in London, said his work was intended to represent the effect on the mind of viewing an art collection.

“I was interested in how the real power behind the collection was not in the objects, but in how the objects affect the viewer,” he explained.

Minister for Arts Jimmy Deenihan and Mayor of Limerick Cllr Gerry McLoughlin were on hand to open the exhibition last Thursday, along with Pat Moylan, chairman of the Arts Council, who declared that the idea behind the loan-out of the collection was that “as many people as possible would see it”.

The exhibition in Limerick, made up of 67 pieces in all from the Arts Council’s 1000-strong collection, notably includes works by Anne Madden, Patrick Collins, Gerald Dillon and Michael Farrell.

The pieces were selected by Paul Tarpey, Anne Horrigan, Baz Burke and John Logan, with LCGA curator Helen Carey overseeing the process.

The slice of the collection in LCGA primarily includes paintings and sculpture acquired by the Arts Council during the early days of the collection in the 1960s and 1970s.

Ms Carey said the selection for Limerick was “chosen to reflect the strong visual arts culture” in the city.

“These pieces reflect the emergence of pop art, graphic art and the swinging sixties and we’re delighted with the collection and excited about it opening to the public,” she added.

Into the Light runs until January 18.

 

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