Limerick artist’s homage to victims of Bangladesh factory collapse

Sheila Stone's installation Faceless, which will go on display in Mary Immaculate College
A VISUAL artist has created a striking exhibition to challenge Western views on cut-price clothing and pay homage to those who died when a clothing factory collapsed in Bangladesh on its first anniversary, writes Anne Sheridan.

A VISUAL artist has created a striking exhibition to challenge Western views on cut-price clothing and pay homage to those who died when a clothing factory collapsed in Bangladesh on its first anniversary, writes Anne Sheridan.

Artist Sheila Stone, of the Contact studio in Limerick, said she was shocked last April by the horrendous loss of life in Dhaka, Bangladesh when the Rana Plaza clothing factory collapsed killing 1,132 workers.

Sheila, who holds a degree in ceramics from the Limerick School of Art & Design, said her anger motivated her to create an art installation to commemorate those who died, and to challenge the public to question the ethics of buying cheap clothing at the expense of the workers in Bangladesh and elsewhere.

The finished art work consists of 1,132 base relief faces modelled in clay and fired in a kiln at 1200 centigrade. They are mounted on a simple black background.

The installation will launched this Friday, May 11, at 2pm near the entrance to the library in Mary Immaculate College throughout April.

It is the first showing of the piece in Limerick, which she hopes to bring to Limerick at a later date.

Entitled Faceless, she said this ceramic mural illustrates the economic imbalance in our global community and the moral imperative to address the social and ethical problems that result.

“These workers enable us in the West to access cheap clothing and other products. It begs the question do we have a moral responsibility to demand the safety and proper conditions and pay for these workers?