Late GAA broadcaster’s West Limerick roots remembered

Gerard Fitzgibbon

Reporter:

Gerard Fitzgibbon

TRIBUTES have been paid to late GAA broadcaster Sean Og O Ceallachain, a native of Newcastle West, who died at the weekend.

TRIBUTES have been paid to late GAA broadcaster Sean Og O Ceallachain, a native of Newcastle West, who died at the weekend.

Mr Og O Ceallachain become a household name in Ireland over the course of a legendary broadcasting career, which spanned 63 years up until he retired from RTE in 2011. He was also an accomplished hurler, representing Dublin in the 1940s and 1950s.

He was born in Newcastle West and spent his early years living in South Quay. Over the years, whenever he was travelling to Kerry with work, he would often drop in to the subsequent residents of his old family home, Mattie and Mae McCoy.

Mr Og O Ceallachain was laid to rest in Fingal, Dublin this week following his death last Sunday at the age of 89. His funeral Mass in Raheny was attended by hundreds of mourners, including his old friend and fellow GAA broadcaster Micheal O Muircheartaigh, former Taoiseach Bertie Ahern, and GAA director general Padraic Duffy.

Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael, Liam O’Neill, described Mr Og O Ceallachain’s passing as “an enormous loss to the GAA and the world of broadcasting”.

“He holds a very special place in GAA hearts, with his unique voice, and was a vital link every Sunday evening with the GAA results. His radio career has been acknowledged as being one of the longest in radio broadcasting history.

“He was a true GAA man and had one of the most recognised voices in GAA circles in the country. I pass on my sympathies to his family and wide circle of friends on behalf of the GAA family.”