Residents vow to fight plans for new road on outkirts of Limerick

Mike Dwane

Reporter:

Mike Dwane

RESIDENTS from the Parteen area say they will continue to fight against proposals for a dual carriageway which they insist will drive through the heart of their village.

RESIDENTS from the Parteen area say they will continue to fight against proposals for a dual carriageway which they insist will drive through the heart of their village.

Edward English, Environmental Community of Parteen, said the emerging preferred route selected by engineers at would leave the school and church on one side of a four-lane road and the local garage, butcher and other businesses on the other.

“It would dramatically impact on quality of life in the village and would cause great difficulty for children going to school and for the elderly, of whom there are many in the area, going about their normal business,” he said.

Transport Minister Leo Varadkar has advanced funding to Clare County Council for preparatory work for the northern distributor road but has admitted to Deputy Willie O’Dea that the Government cannot currently funding the capital costs - estimated to be well over €100 million for the entire project from Coonagh to the old Dublin Road.

Minister Varadkar considers the first phase of the project - from Coonagh to Knockalisheen - as crucial to the Limerick Regeneration programme in opening up access to Moyross, while the project as a whole would boost the local economy by improving access between Shannon, industry in Plassey and the University of Limerick.

One man who has vowed to fight the road scheme tooth and nail is local author Donal O Riain, who said the proposed route would level the house he built in Parteen in 1964.

“The plans would also mean my son’s house could be torn down to make way for the road. That would affect my family even more. And it will destroy communities. We simply cannot let this happen. We don’t want to go,” said the historian.

Having expressed his satisfaction with Saturday’s turnout, Mr English told the Leader that residents were now focused on making their formal submission in the next two weeks as part of the public consultation process.