June 15

Maureen Sparling

Reporter:

Maureen Sparling

CARDINAL AT ST MARY’S CATHEDRAL 2: “In spite of all this success the Nuncio found it difficult to understand the local squabbling that continued to divide the Irish leaders and Military rulers. He was soon to preside at the funeral of Bishop Arthur of Limerick, who had been his friend and adviser. As the local jealousies and intrigues continued, the Nuncio was denounced by the Confederation, and barely escaped arrest as he left Kilkenny. He made his way to Galway and got the first ship available to France as a very disillusioned envoy. Very soon, King Charles of England was to be a prisoner of the Parliamentarians, and Cromwell was to be the new leader and was soon to wreak vengeance on Irish Catholics for having supported the King in his struggle for power. Cromwell landed in Dublin in August 1649 and thus was to begin the saddest era of Irish history. Eoin Roe died in Cavan on his way south in 1648. It was rumoured he was poisoned at a Banquet in Derry the day before.” (So ends this extremely interesting piece from, “Light on the Past,” by the late Canon Brendan Connellan. More from that precious historical account of parish origins next week).

CARDINAL AT ST MARY’S CATHEDRAL 2: “In spite of all this success the Nuncio found it difficult to understand the local squabbling that continued to divide the Irish leaders and Military rulers. He was soon to preside at the funeral of Bishop Arthur of Limerick, who had been his friend and adviser. As the local jealousies and intrigues continued, the Nuncio was denounced by the Confederation, and barely escaped arrest as he left Kilkenny. He made his way to Galway and got the first ship available to France as a very disillusioned envoy. Very soon, King Charles of England was to be a prisoner of the Parliamentarians, and Cromwell was to be the new leader and was soon to wreak vengeance on Irish Catholics for having supported the King in his struggle for power. Cromwell landed in Dublin in August 1649 and thus was to begin the saddest era of Irish history. Eoin Roe died in Cavan on his way south in 1648. It was rumoured he was poisoned at a Banquet in Derry the day before.” (So ends this extremely interesting piece from, “Light on the Past,” by the late Canon Brendan Connellan. More from that precious historical account of parish origins next week).

KNOCK PILGRIMAGE: The annual pilgrimage to Knock will take place on Thursday, July 4, 2013. The bus will leave the Island Road at 9.00am. The return cost is €15. Further information can be obtained from Ursula at the Parish Office on any Monday, Wednesday or Friday from 3.00-5.00pm, 061-416300.

NOVENA PRAYERS: There will be no Novena taking place in our church this year. However, Novena prayers will be said following the 10.00am Mass from the June 15-22, 2013.

TWO EVENTS AT LIBRARY: ‘Love Live Musical Day 2013,’ Lunchtime Musical Gig with New Blue Sue will take place at 1.00pm on Friday, June 21st. Polar expert and best-selling author of “An Unsung Hero, Tom Crean, on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 8.00pm. All are very welcome and admission is free.

CATHEDRAL LUNCHTIME CONCERT: There will be a Lunchtime Concert in St Mary’s Cathedral on this coming Wednesday, June 19th. Performing there will be, Owen Gilhooley (baritone), Irina Dernova (piano) – music by Mahler, sung by this internationally acclaimed Munster musician. The concert begins at 1.15pm and concludes at 2.00pm. Admission is free but a contribution to the Retiring Collection would be greatly appreciated and this will go to aid the Friends of St Mary’s Cathedral Music.

GANDELOW DRAW: The draw for the famous Curraghgower Gandelow will take place on Saturday, June 15, 2013, at 8.00pm in the Mall Bar. Mayor Gerry McLoughlin will do the honours of pulling the lucky winner’s ticket from the pack. It augurs well for a most enjoyable evening, so come along and you just might be cruising home.

LEGEND OF LOOP HEAD: In light of the supreme accolade secured by the Loop Head Visitor’s Centre recently, it was interesting for me to come across a poem entitled, “The Legend of Loop Head, Cucullin’s Leap,” by the 19th century poet, Canon Richard Ross-Lewin, a poet a class of mine ‘resurrected’ in the late 80s when I was responsible many adult classes. It seems the misfortunate man was pursued almost to the death by a lover he quite obviously didn’t want any more to do with. He ended up in the County of Clare where he eventually made the giant leap, a chasm which the lady in hot pursuit couldn’t even anticipate attempting. I suppose it was a case of, greater hate (or fright) than this has no man has than he risks his very own life to get away from an ‘amorous’ pursuant! Here are the final four lines of the 28 line poem;

“He took a spring and away he went,

Over that terrible gaping rent.

‘Tis fifty feet and you can’t deny,

‘Twas a record leap or a record lie.”

VITAL LOCAL FACILITIES: The King’s Island is by far the most ancient part of an already ancient city. As you stroll up Verdant Place on to Thomond Bridge you will encounter the following words etched into the wall on the river side. “Public Walk: The King’s Island Embankment executed under the directions of the Corporation of Limerick and the Commissioners of Her Majesty’s Woods and Forests; completed in October, 1848. Jeremy Hall, Mayor of Limerick.” It is difficult on a brilliant sunny morning such as it is today (the hottest so far this year the radio is announcing), as I type these few words, to imagine what life was like way back then, but one thing is for sure it was not easy. Men worked hard, very hard as manual labour would have been the norm, with no such thing as tea breaks; you can be certain of that. It was also the norm in those dim and distant times that women bore many children, often one year after the other with little or no time to catch up. Holidays was anathema to them as they scrubbed their knuckles thin on the old washing boards in order to keep the family’s clothes clean. Can you just imagine then what a proud day it was to have their area deemed a specified walkway?

Now in the 21st century that same area has been once again issued with a new lease of life over the past two years. First of all was the building of what is termed, ‘a state of the Arts’ Créche at the beginning of the Island Bank. Next came the outstanding culinary success that is our new Restaurant followed by the erection of the superb eye-catching and exceptionally well planned building that is the King’s Island Primary Care Centre, which incorporates a very well equipped Chemist shop. Then, just this past month the all important and very essential Digital Computer Enclosure, called ‘D’Hub’ which is situated on Old Church Street, has been opened to the public. Together with the former three establishments, the latter has most definitely breathed new life into a fairly dead street. As well as the special features of this pristine enclosure which I mentioned in last week’s notes, there is a delightful Conservatory to the rear of the building, where any visitor can enjoy a tea or a coffee. This building is open from 9.00am-9.00pm, Monday to Friday and anyone is welcome to drop in. Also, the most beautiful Community Garden which is situated opposite the entrance to Villier’s Square and which was created by workers from Civic Trust, is a wonderful asset to the area. It is a great place to bring children for a picnic as it is very safe and has ample seating area for the parents or grand-parents to occupy while the children run freely about.

SYMPATHY: The death occurred of a wonderful neighbour, Nancy O’Leary (O’Connor), a resident of Island View Terrace, earlier this week. Nancy was a very warm person and spent he life caring for her family. Nancy had been in a Nursing Home for over a decade prior to her demise, a place she had adapted to very well indeed. No doubt when she first went there to stay she brought great joy to the other elderly residents there. She was just that kind of person who saw good in everyone. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to her sons and daughters, her extended family, relatives and many, many friends who had come to know her as a very loving and caring person

KILKEE BECKONS: With the hint of good weather by way of a strange beam of heat (I think it’s called ‘sun’), issuing forth its delightful rays from the sky of late, our thoughts automatically return to the few days in Kilkee. We can all readily appreciate this gem of a seaside town as it now stands, but this week I take a peep at the past and see how things were in the 1800s.

For example, the extensive bog surrounding Kilkee was very valuable in providing cheap fuel. Following storms, a large amount of seaweed was available and a cart was used to collect it. People would go around with kishes (wicker baskets) on their backs. Twelve months old seaweed was considered the best manure. Most of the women wore coarse, home-made flannel gowns and petticoats. Very few of them wore stockings or shoes. The men were dressed in grey, heavy coarse woollen coats and they wore boots and stockings. The linen they wore was surprisingly well coloured. Most of the linen was grown, spun and manufactured locally. Supplies of fish depended on the weather but there was also a substantial amount of mutton available. Milk, butter and bread were available but vegetables were scarce.

CARRIGEEN MOSS FOR HEALTH: Carrigeen moss grew plentiful along Kilkee’s coastline but its value wasn’t discovered until 1830. During the Famine at that time, the moss was first used as food and was found to be very nutritious. It soon became a food for infants and invalids. Even back as far as the 1800s, Kilkee was deemed a very good place to come, where people would be cured of injuries and pains in the joints. Patients would be rubbed with seaweed that had been boiled into a jelly. The benefit of the sea water was an aid to good healing results. Visitors were also impressed with the kind and caring, sharing ways of the people of Kilkee.