St Paul Aug 17

Attacks: The recent number of attacks on elderly people in different parts of the country shocked people everywhere first of all by the violence perpetrated on the old people and also by the callousness of the attacks. Old people in our society are feeling more vulnerable day by day and with the approach of winter this fear is heightened. Many young people seem to think that older people ‘are there to be taken’ and that they are an easy target. A society that attacks its most vulnerable and weakest is believed to be a society that is going wrong. The Gardaí are unable to be present at all scenes of attack but it relies on the help of all in the community and those involved in neighbourhood watch. It is imperative that neighbours keep a watch on the older members of their neighbourhood.

Attacks: The recent number of attacks on elderly people in different parts of the country shocked people everywhere first of all by the violence perpetrated on the old people and also by the callousness of the attacks. Old people in our society are feeling more vulnerable day by day and with the approach of winter this fear is heightened. Many young people seem to think that older people ‘are there to be taken’ and that they are an easy target. A society that attacks its most vulnerable and weakest is believed to be a society that is going wrong. The Gardaí are unable to be present at all scenes of attack but it relies on the help of all in the community and those involved in neighbourhood watch. It is imperative that neighbours keep a watch on the older members of their neighbourhood.

It has been reported recently by the Senior Citizens Parliament that there has been an increase of violence in homes by family members on the older members and that this is usually because of financial difficulties. There is no excuse for such attacks and irrespective of circumstances that prevail this has to be condemned. Admittedly, the economic difficulties throughout the country at present has given rise to such attacks but this cannot be expected to excuse such practices.

Ageism is a currently coined word that is used when referring to one of this life’s inevitabilities with the passing of each day. However, when used its meaning seems to be biased towards older people. True, to-days world is faster, technically speedier and the emphasis appears to be the accomplishment of more and more in the shortest period of time possible. This can be expressed in briefer terms such as ‘the saving of time’. But what does this really mean? Even the bigger imponderable “what is time?” Each of us is born with nothing but a ‘beart’ of time that we take for granted to utilise. It is only when this time is getting shorter that we re-evaluate it.

Everyone’s age must be accepted, appreciated and understood. It is only a numerical record of each person’s duty to live the life that they have been gifted with. We do this daily in family, community and society and each one does so in his or her own unique manner. The two important words are unique manner. This very uniqueness is developed with each passing day and consequently old people have acquired many aspects such as wisdom, maturity, experience and knowledge all of which enhances their persona and personality. The commercial market may appreciate young people more than old people because of their spending power and it is no great surprise that it proclaims that it is a young person’s world. As a result of this older people are so to speak pushed into the background. This has always been so for youth must have its chance but it is much more pronounced in to-days world. Nevertheless, this is understandable as in nature itself each year when the new growth replaces the old growth. Yet, all advancement is an amalgam of the past and the present to formulate the future. Therefore, old people must be always appreciated for their acquired riches in personality and wisdom.

JUST TIME: Young people must be given to understand that they will in time also become old and less active.There is an old Gaelic saying that states “Níl in aon rud ach seal” which translates as ‘there is only a spell of time in all things’. Of course, when one is young such a thought could never be conceived or entertained by youth for the perception of time can seem to be limitless for the young. However, as we all know only too well this perception changes with the passing of time. In previous generations the acceptable societal norm for young people was that they were to be seen and not to be heard. Adults were to be obeyed and this was the order of the day. But such an attitude is negative and it can be a double edged sword.

Older people are now sometimes ridiculed or ignored altogether. In fact, in the Ireland of to-day with the problems of the health service executive a person could be forgiven for concluding that age is a liability. We live in a faster world where older people are being left behind because they are deemed to be too slow, not ‘with it’ and burdensome. The technological world moves with speed and is becoming faster. Communication now is speedier. You go with the flow as the cliche puts it.

Older people are a resource in whichever community they dwell. Their knowledge, wisdom and experience is a resource They have experienced the hard facts of daily life, some more than others, and they have been tempered, so to speak, in the daily fire of everyday existence. Consequently they may be more capable of dealing with the difficulties that can be visited on our society. Basically, life is but an experience. Previous generations have always appreciated the knowledge that old people had gathered through their lives. It has been the norm that among other nationalities, far removed from the Western world, people adhered with respect and appreciation for the wise in their communities and societies. However, one wonders is our society the architect or the designer of its own difficulties because we segregate the different age groups to mix with each other. Consequently, each group is somewhat unfamiliar with and about the other. Take for example the mix of mature and younger students in college that has been found to be beneficial for all simply because each group is more familiar with the other. Perhaps if there was more rapport and positive inter-mingling between the groups in everyday society there may not be such a divergence of attitude. As the Gaelic sean-fhocail puts it so aptly “ar scáth a céile a mhaireann na daoine” which translates as ‘people live in the shadow of each other’ and how true it is. This is what is commonly referred to as community and it is the amalgam of all the groups that makes this our society. The separation between the groups that is encouraged to be the norm nowadays could be the stick that creates the greatest hurt in our society. Age action week is the other side of the approach and we will accept it as the carrot. There is also another old Gaelic saying that states “Mol an óige agus tiocaidh sé” and this translates as follows “praise youth and it will flourish”. Youth is the new life that grows from birth and in due course replaces the older generation. Each must be seen and understood to compliment the other and this must be done with due respect and regard for the other. By way of summation on all the foregoing it would be proper and certainly best if all strands of society made every effort to accept and regard the other for what they are simply members of a community that functions within our society. The essence of this is mutual respect.

GOOD LUCK: These notes would be less than proper if one did not acknowledge the fact that the Limerick Seniior hurling team are playing in the semi-final of the All-Ireland championship against near neighbours County Clare on Sunday, August 18. This fixture has been a long time coming for Limerick but now that the match will take place on Sunday all of Limerick wishes the team every success and hopefully they will go on to the All-Ireland final. But if beaten by the Clare team few if any would only wish them the very best for they are good neighbours.

CREDIT UNION BURSARY AWARD: The Mungret/St. Paul’s Credit Union has a very novel type of Bursary Award which they launched last year for the first time. It proposes to do so again this year. With the Leaving Cert results on the way, many of those who sat the exams are now beginning to think about what lies ahead in terms of third level education. Starting college is an exciting time in any young person’s life and often marks the beginning of financial independence. However as well as being exciting, it is also a very costly time for students and parents. With this in mind, last year MPCC Credit Union launched its Third Level Education Bursary Award to help ease the financial burden on one deserving winner. The inaugural winner in 2012 was Michelle Nicholas of Gouldavoher who is currently studying in Mary Immaculate College. Once again, the credit union is now looking for eligible candidates from its members for this year’s Bursary. The Bursary Award is worth € 2,000 per annum up to four years; therefore the winner can potentially receive € 8,000 towards funding their third level education costs.

Given the high financial value of the award, MPCC Credit Union, decided that instead of a lottery style draw or academic achievements determining the winner, the recipient of the award will have to show their efforts as to how they actively make a contribution to their local community or have improved the lives of others through their actions. Candidates are also invited to show how they have created a greater awareness of an issue or cause they are involved in. This criteria is in keeping with the community based ethos of the credit union and the strong belief underpinning the movement that people matter most.

With a closing date of August 31, applicants are urged to get their applications in plenty of time.

Further details can be obtained from any of the credit union offices in Dooradoyle, Mungret & Patrickswell or on their Facebook page & website www.mpcccreditunion.ie

EXHIBITION: The exhibition in the County library, Doordoyle at present is by a combination of five artists from Limerick and Clare with their own distinctive style and approach to their artwork. The artists concerned are Helen McMahon, Thomas Brady, Eugene Noonan, Louise McMahon and Sam Fleming who have presented their artistic work depicting landscape in Co. Clare, scenes from nature and iconic buildings and places such as King John’s and Holy Island in Co. Clare.

REGISTER OF ELECTORS: By now most people will have put the last referendum and any thought about elections out of their minds but there is to be a local election taking place next May when the present City Council and the County Council will be part of history and the new numerically reduced Council will be elected to administer for the extended city. Furthermore, it is probable that there will be another referendum later this year although that has not been verified yet. If you were not able to cast your vote in the last referendum because you were not on the register of electors but you would like to be able to do so on the next occasion you should check if your name is on the register of electors now. You may do this by going to the County Hall, Dooradoyle road or to any Post Office or Library and checking if your name and address are on it.

RE-OPENED: Many people regretted the closing of the Jesuit church in the Crescent during the past number of years. The community of the Sacred Heart of Jesus had left the building and the nearby residence. A new community of the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest are now resident there and they worship and administer in the church each day and they are endeavouring to restore it as a place of worship. The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is now celebrated in Latin on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 8.30am each morning and on Friday at 7.30pm

SHAPE UP: Getting fit and in shape is now something that many people are paying more attention to especially since the fine summer weather commenced. An enterprising young man has opened the’ Better Body Bootcamp ‘every Thursday morning 10am and every Wednesday evening 7pm in Mungret Gaa club will be ideal for you. You can participate in a variety of exercises including Boxercise, Circuit training, Body toning. For more info contact John on 087-9115411 or jean on 086-1025906.

COMPETITION: The Limerick County Library at Dooradoyle has at present a very engaging competition for children. This will continue during the summer holiday period. The children participating must sign up at the desk in the library and on doing so they receive a Creepy House poster. They are then obliged to read six books of their own choice and on completion of each book they will receive a sticker for their poster. On completion of reading the six books when they present their poster with the six stickers at the library desk they will receive a medal and a certificate. The age of the children participating in this competition is 4years to 12 years so all primary school children are eligible to participate.

MUNGRET/ST. PAUL’S GAA: Club Barbecue: A family community barbeque will take place in the club house on Friday 23rd of August. Food being served from 7pm to 10pm, live music from 8pm. Adult tickets €10, Children €3, tickets available from the clubhouse each Monday night.

Date for your Diary: Sunday 1st of September: The Healthy club have wheels in motion for a Community Family Fun day with a lot of activities for all ages some of which are a sack race, egg and spoon race, 3 legged race, obstacle course, penalty shoot, soak your coach, colouring competition, wife carrying race and many more. There will also be a Book and Cake sale. If you have books you would like to donate or would like to help out by baking (Ideally something that would go nice with a free cup of tea) please email mungretstpaulshealthyclub@gmail.com or contact Wanda on 087-6236709. Don’t forget Sunday 1st of September.