Residents of Limerick estate concerned over potholes

Mike Dwane

Reporter:

Mike Dwane

Residents in Corbally are angry over the number of potholes in the estate
WITH 35 potholes counted on a 100-metre stretch of road, a corner of Limerick has been described as “more like Mogadishu than the Mill Road”.

WITH 35 potholes counted on a 100-metre stretch of road, a corner of Limerick has been described as “more like Mogadishu than the Mill Road”.

So things have hardly improved at Meadowbrook since last February when one resident said of the potholes that” it would be easier to drive into Beirut”.

So bad is the damage on the Corbally estate that residents are taking an alternative route out, according to Adam Kearney, a member of the residents association of the neighbouring Suil na hAbhann.

“The fact of the matter is that people in Meadowbrook are now using our road and it is getting busier down here. There is that secondary impact on us. But you couldn’t blame the people in Meadowbrook it has gone so bad. It is a health and safety issue for them. The place is just peppered with potholes,” said Mr Kearney.

Meadowbrook, he said, was a 30-year-old estate and the main problem with maintenance was that it had not been taken in charge by Limerick City and County Council despite appeals from the local community. It was a situation Mr Kearney said local councillors and TDs were all-too-well aware of.

Mr Kearney has also spoken to council officials on the matter.

“I have had phone calls and various meetings with them and there is an issue there with the sewage and waste water treatment and all that would cost the council x amount to rectify. A lot has to do with the bond entered into by the former developer who built the place 30 years ago. The council don’t want to get burnt financially but at the same time they are saying to me that they will have to bite the bullet eventually. But it has taken a long time,” Mr Kearney.

The 100 or so householders in Meadowbrook who were paying local property tax for local services deserved nothing less than to have their estate given the attention it needed, Mr Kearney said.

He was hopeful his own estate of Suil na hAbhann - which is around 10 years old - would be taken in charge in the coming months.