Noonan claims ‘progress’ in war on drugs at Limerick launch

Aine Fitzgerald

Reporter:

Aine Fitzgerald

Finance Minister Michael Noonan at the launch. Picture: Don Moloney / Press 22
THE KNOCK-on effect of alcohol abuse “for women who unfortunately are sometimes the victims of abusive husbands” was highlighted by Minister for Finance Michael Noonan at the launch of the Drugs and Alcohol Forum Awareness Week.

THE KNOCK-on effect of alcohol abuse “for women who unfortunately are sometimes the victims of abusive husbands” was highlighted by Minister for Finance Michael Noonan at the launch of the Drugs and Alcohol Forum Awareness Week.

Speaking in Limerick this Monday, Minister Noonan said that “because alcohol is a legal drug and it is socially and culturally acceptable, at times it is a harder drug to make people aware of the risks associated.”

“I think you all know from your observation of life around you that alcohol has caused an awful lot of problems in families, an awful lot of difficulties,” said Minister Noonan. “And it causes particular difficulties for women who unfortunately are sometimes the victims of abusive husbands.”

The Finance Minister was addressing delegates at the launch of the Mid-West Regional Drugs and Alcohol Forum Awareness Week in the Absolute Hotel on Sir Harry’s Mall. The event also saw the launch of the Evaluation of the Impact of the Limerick Social, Health and Education Programme and the launch of the Limerick City Community Network.

Minister Noonan pointed out how drugs are “right throughout society now and it’s an international problem. Drugs and alcohol awareness is very important in the community but especially for young lives,” he noted.

“There is a drugs problem everywhere in the world. You come across it in a television series like Love/Hate and in the cinemas as well. Young people, sometimes just at the point when they have left school and are looking for a job, they get hooked on illicit drugs and it destroys their life.”

While he acknowledged that those leading the war against drugs have “a big task, a big fight”, it is one, he said, they must continue.

“You have a hard job but you are making progress. I see the change in Limerick. It’s not as bad as it was in the late ‘80s,” he said, thanking Gearoid Prendergast and the organising committee for inviting him to launch the programme.