DCSIMG

Neglect in Limerick estates to come under European focus

Former housing Minister Jan O'Sullivan opening 35 new apartments for older people as part of the Regeneration Programme in Southill this May

Former housing Minister Jan O'Sullivan opening 35 new apartments for older people as part of the Regeneration Programme in Southill this May

  • by Anne Sheridan
 

PARTS of Limerick’s estates have been identified as having conditions so appalling that they violate basic human rights, and have been highlighted in a complaint submitted to the Council of Europe.

The International Federation for Human Rights, based in Paris, has lodged claims on behalf of 130,000 residents in estates in Limerick and inner city Dublin over sewage problems, persistent leaks and harmful damp and mould.

The 51-page complaint filed with the Council of Europe accuses the Irish government of presiding over appalling living standards and failing to meet basic and legal housing requirements.

The report criticises the Limerick Regeneration scheme for failing to complete promised work in Moyross, Southill, St Mary’s Park and Ballinacurra Weston.

It points out that just €116 million of the once €3billion programme has been spent. However, this has now been cut to just under €300m.In response, Limerick City and County Council, which has taken over the work of the Regeneration agencies, said 76 new homes will be built this year alone.

Head of Regeneration, Caroline Curley explained there are currently 139 funded projects operating across Limerick to help those living in disadvantaged estates. However, Moyross parish priest Fr Tony O’Riordan said that levels of deprivation and childhood adversity in Moyross continue to be “off the Richter scale”, seven years after Limerick Regeneration was launched to tackle the city’s battle with serious social problems.

The landmark case is being taken under the European Social Charter, which guarantees social and economic human rights. It also focuses on crime and anti-social behaviour in the complexes and accuses the State of a strategy of deliberate neglect to further run down already dilapidated flat complexes which sit on prime development land. Karim Lahidji, president of the organisation, said: “The right to adequate housing is a fundamental human right and a prerequisite for the enjoyment of other rights and the appropriate development of families and children.”

 

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