DCSIMG

Limerick students get a feel for crash reality

Operation Lifesaver: Gardai, firefighters and paramedics remove an injured woman from a car during the demonstration at Mary Immaculate College while, below, students Eleanor McSweeney, Aoife OMalley and Eithne Hickey look on. Picture: Adrian Butler

Operation Lifesaver: Gardai, firefighters and paramedics remove an injured woman from a car during the demonstration at Mary Immaculate College while, below, students Eleanor McSweeney, Aoife OMalley and Eithne Hickey look on. Picture: Adrian Butler

  • by David Hurley
 

PART of the campus of Mary Immaculate College was transformed into a crash scene this week for the latest Project Lifesaver demonstration.

As part of the road safety initiative, members of the emergency services replicated a two-car collision, which involved a fatality.

Dozens of students who attended the event witnessed first-hand how gardai, firefighters and paramedics operate when they are deployed at the scene of serious road accidents.

The ‘crash’ saw one man being knocked down and killed by a suspected drink-driver while the female driver of the second car had to be cut from her vehicle by firefighters before being removed to hospital with serious injuries.

The multi-agency initiative was brought to the college by the Mary Immaculate Students’ Union (MISU), and the Health Promotion Unit and the Safety Office at the College.

“Our hope is that this road safety initiative, incorporating a crash scene, will serve to improve road safety awareness and will make a difference to everyone that witnessed first-hand what the scene of a fatal road traffic collision is like,” said Caroline Duffy, health and safety officer at Mary Immaculate College.

After the demonstration, students attended a presentation on road safety from members of the emergency services.

Garda Tony Miniter of the divisional traffic corps says Project Lifesaver has had a major impact on driver behaviour in Limerick.

“These events are massively important, around 26,000 students - between second and third level - have seen demonstrations like this. Road deaths in Limerick have gone through the floor and it is a fantastic record from the point of view of the emergency services and from the public’s point of view,” he said.

To date, just three people have died on Limerick roads this year compared to 15 during 2011.

President of the MISU, Darragh Wynne, said initiatives such as Project Lifesaver are vital to highlight the dangers associated with the country’s roads to students.

“It’s of huge benefit to have the Limerick Lifesaver Project on campus. The Christmas period can be particularly dangerous on the roads, so this visit is quite timely,” he said.

 

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