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Limerick residents’ group submit flood report to Taoiseach

Seanie Quinlivan pictured on Oliver Plunkett Street in St Mary's Park, following the flooding. The chairman of a residents' committee set up following the flooding, he has authored the report with the help of Dr Martin Kay. Picture: Brian Arthur/ Press 22.

Seanie Quinlivan pictured on Oliver Plunkett Street in St Mary's Park, following the flooding. The chairman of a residents' committee set up following the flooding, he has authored the report with the help of Dr Martin Kay. Picture: Brian Arthur/ Press 22.

  • by Anne Sheridan
 

CONCERNED residents across King’s Island have prepared a detailed report for the Taoiseach Enda Kenny on the ongoing issues surrounding the flood damage - and the unpreparedness of the local authorities to deal with the crisis.

Following the worst flooding the city has ever seen, a 25-page report by the residents was submitted to Eamon Gilmore when he visited the worst affected area on Friday last.

A report is also due to the sent to the Taoiseach Enda Kenny shortly. A series of six meetings were held in the affected areas in the city’s northside since the flooding on February 1, and feedback from each of those meetings has been compiled in the report.

Seanie Quinlivan, a resident of St Ita’s Street and chair of the committee, is urging the Government to take preventative actions before the next high tides arrive in early March.

“Quite simply, normal engagement with the local authority cannot work fast enough - we have had to take the lead,” he wrote to the Taoiseach. He outlines the “chaos and disbelief that ensued” on the day of the floods, saying that “effective management of the situation never followed until the residents of King’s Island began to assert control themselves.

He stated that the intention of the report is “not to attack personalities or to destroy reputations but to illuminate avoidable shortcomings which, in turn, have aggravated the situation of those in the path of the wave that hit King’s Island”.

“While a public relief effort did materialise, there was no evident co-ordination of the resources deployed and no clear direction of effort. The public response seemed ineffective. Follow-up support and assistance seemed deficient. Even two weeks later there was no clear statement of intention from the local authorities. An urgent call for on-site assistance in dealing with a public health threat provoked no reaction obvious”.

 

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