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Limerick man battles to avoid eviction from city home

Patrick Collopy is facing eviction from his home in Bishop Street: 'I have been going through hell with this battle, let alone trying to cope with loss of my mother'. Picture: Mike Cowhey

Patrick Collopy is facing eviction from his home in Bishop Street: 'I have been going through hell with this battle, let alone trying to cope with loss of my mother'. Picture: Mike Cowhey

  • by Nick Rabbitts
 

A LIMERICK man says he is willing to go to court to stop the council evicting him from his home.

Patrick Collopy, 26, who is living in Bishop Street, has been told by Limerick City Council that he will be kicked out of the home he shared with his mother Rita until her death last year.

Now, an online petition started in a bid to drum up support for his case has drawn more than 2,000 signatures.

Patrick moved into the house in 2012 to care for his terminally ill mother, who was moved from Moyross under the regeneration project, and took over the payment of the rent, which went up as he was added to the book.

After her sad death, aged just 50, Patrick received a phone call from the council telling him that he must vacate the house on the grounds of the two-year tenancy rule.

He is furious with the council for insisting he move - and says he cannot afford rent on the private market due to the fact he only works limited hours at Dunnes Stores in Henry Street.

“The City Council deliberately gave my mum a house with two bedrooms, because they knew I would there four nights a week,” he claimed.

Following his mother’s death, Patrick got a letter from the council stating that his rent would be reduced.

But shortly after, he received a call telling him the house had to be returned to Limerick City Council.

“I have been up to date with my rent, and have never been trouble with the law. I have been going through hell with this battle, let alone trying to cope with the loss of my mother which has had a traumatic effect on me,” he said.

Although the council wrote to Patrick again on March 12, he remains in the house.

He launched the petition to raise awareness of what he describes as a “cold and heartless” decision by council.

And within a few hours, more than 1,000 people signed it.

“When I first put it online, I thought if I got 100 names I would be doing well. I think a lot of people have had issues with the housing and the council,” he said.

A council spokesperson said they cannot comment on individual cases.

 

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