DCSIMG

Increase in doctors graduating from UL

Bachelor of Medicine: Graduate Victoria Ronan, Limerick city. Picture: Liam Burke/Press 22

Bachelor of Medicine: Graduate Victoria Ronan, Limerick city. Picture: Liam Burke/Press 22

  • by Anne Sheridan
 

OVER 90 doctors graduated from the University of Limerick’s graduate entry medical school this week.

In all, 146 students graduated from the school and clinical therapies department, including 94 doctors who were conferred with their medical degrees as they became the fourth graduating class of the medical school.

Among the new cohort of doctors are students with undergraduate degrees varying from zoology, anthropology to music and archaeology.

Established seven years ago, the medical school programme at UL is the largest graduate entry medical education programme in country. The programme is still expanding and by 2015 will have 95 new doctors graduating each year.

Speaking at the conferring ceremony, Professor Don Barry, president of UL, paid tribute to the Health Service Executive, which is working with the school and its students.

“The support that we have received from the employees of the HSE and from its management staff at local, regional and national levels has been exceptional. Above all, UL is greatly indebted to the very large number of clinicians who have been instrumental in educating our both our GEMS and clinical therapy students, by sharing their expertise and supporting our students’ professional growth,” he said.

“We are proud to be working with the HSE on a shared facility to be located on the University Hospital Limerick campus – a Clinical Education and Research facility - which will enhance the delivery of our medical programme but also support the education services required by the University Hospital Limerick community.

He highlighted that over 80 general practices throughout Munster and beyond have embraced the medical school and its students.

“The GEMS is unique, not only within Ireland but internationally, in terms of the emphasis that it places on clinical training in primary care settings. A full 25% of all such training at UL is provided in general practice settings,” he concluded.

Twenty-six students graduated from the four-year Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy - the only physiotherapy academic programme in Ireland situated outside of Dublin.

 

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