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App developed in Limerick to keep the doctor away

Look app-y: At the launch of the Antibiotic App were Dr Lorraine Power, department of microbiology, Mid-Western Regional Hospital; Fergal Mc Donnell, Doctot; Dr Nuala OConnell, department of microbiology; Siobhan Barrett, department of pharmacy; Prof Declan Lyons, department of medicine; Anne Harnett and Susan Stack, both department of pharmacy; and Paula Cussen-Murphy, general manager, Mid-Western Regional Hospital

Look app-y: At the launch of the Antibiotic App were Dr Lorraine Power, department of microbiology, Mid-Western Regional Hospital; Fergal Mc Donnell, Doctot; Dr Nuala OConnell, department of microbiology; Siobhan Barrett, department of pharmacy; Prof Declan Lyons, department of medicine; Anne Harnett and Susan Stack, both department of pharmacy; and Paula Cussen-Murphy, general manager, Mid-Western Regional Hospital

DOCTORS will no longer have to dust down weighty tomes as they go about treating patients.

Thanks to new technology being developed in Limerick, medical professionals can instead consult the smartphone in their pocket.

Antibiotic is the latest of 18 medical applications for Apple devices developed by Doctot - or Doctors Tools of Trade - the health informatics company set up by consultant physician Prof Declan Lyons, Fergal McDonnell and Macdara Butler.

Using technology to treat patients with infections and confine their spread in clinical settings, the new app has been developed by Doctot in collaboration with Dr Nuala O’Connell and Dr Lorraine Power, consultant microbiologists at the Mid-Western Regional Hospital and Anne Hartnett, senior lecturer in clinical pharmacology at the Medical School in UL.

Devised “by clinicians for clinicians”, the app serves as “a treatment guide” for the more commonly seen infections.

Said Dr O’Connell: “healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) can largely be prevented by adherence to three basic infection control principles: hand hygiene, environmental hygiene and prudent antimicrobial prescribing”.

“New technologies can support HCAI strategies by helping get things done differently, effectively and more reliably. Smartphones and other mobile devices are widely used by clinicians to access point of care information to guide their clinical management. We believe that this is a high quality app that will promote rational antibiotic prescribing.”

Antibiotic is being made available to medical staff across the hospital network in Limerick and can be downloaded from the iTunes store.

 

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