Limerick man told to stay out of trouble or go to prison

A YOUNG man who pleaded guilty to more than two dozen criminal offences has been told he will go to prison for two years if he doesn’t stay out of trouble.

A YOUNG man who pleaded guilty to more than two dozen criminal offences has been told he will go to prison for two years if he doesn’t stay out of trouble.

Martin Faulkner, aged 22, of Long Pavement Halting Site pleaded guilty, at Limerick Court, to a total of 28 charges relating to 18 different incidents over the past two-and-a-half years.

Judge Eugene O’Kelly was told the married father-of-one had committed a variety of offences during that time.

On April 4, 2011, he stole an Xbox games console from an apartment at Groody Student Village after he had been invited to a house party there.

Less than a week later he stole a bottle of Micky Finns green apple liquor from an off-licence in Thomondgate and in July 2011 he stole a high-visability jacket from a premises on the Dock Road.

On another occasion, he broke into the Caherdavin branch of Bank of Ireland and stole an employee’s mobile phone from a back-office.

Faulkner also admitted stealing clothing worth €19 from Penny’s, O’Connell Street and to stealing sportswear worth €37 from Lifestyle Sports.

Insp Seamus Nolan said on April 2, 2010 the defendant was caught on Thomas Street with “five bags” of drugs worth €80 for his own use.

Faulkner also pleaded guilry to several criminal damage charges and he admitted refusing to pay a €12 taxi fare in June 2011.

Solicitor Ted McCarthy said his client has a history of “serious drinking” and drug abuse but that he is anxious to turn his life around now that he is a father.

He said he had pleaded guilty to all of the offences and he told the court he has not been in any trouble for some time.

In addition to the theft, criminal damage, drugs and public order charges, Judge Eugene O’Kelly noted that Faulker has a dreadful record of not turning up for court hearings.

However, in the circumstances and given the delay in finalising some of the cases, the judge said he was not going to send Faulkner to jail immediately.

“I’ hope I never send him to jail,” he added.

The judge imposed consecutive prison sentences totalling 23 months but suspended them for two years.

“He can decide himself if he stays on the right road or whether he serves the sentences,” said the judge who added that if Faulkner comes before the court again for any matter the sentences will be activated.