Limerick villages come up smelling of roses in Tidy Towns

Aine Fitzgerald

Reporter:

Aine Fitzgerald

Mary Murphy, niece of the late Bishop Henry Murphy, at his memorial garden in Ardpatrick this week after the village was highly commended by the Tidy Towns judges. Picture: Michael Cowhey
ONCE again the village of Adare has come up smelling of roses having retained its title as the tidiest village in Limerick after it secured an impressive 316 points in this year’s Tidy Towns competition.

ONCE again the village of Adare has come up smelling of roses having retained its title as the tidiest village in Limerick after it secured an impressive 316 points in this year’s Tidy Towns competition.

The picture perfect village won the County Prize and was also awarded a gold medal.

“It is always great to be recognised and appreciated in a national competition, particularly the Tidy Towns,” said Michael Brennan, chairman of Adare Tidy Towns said.

“It has been a great year for Adare,” he added, pointing out that Adare is now also in line as one of five towns for the title of Best Tourist Small Town.

“When you get up into the award categories it is very hard to add to your points,” Vicki Nash, chairperson of Newcastle West Tidy Towns committee said.

Other high achievers in the competition – the results of which were announced at The Helix Theatre in Dublin on Monday afternoon – were Ardpatrick (309), Galbally (308), the town of Kilmallock (303). Broadford (299), and Castleconnell (296).

Ardpatrick, Galbally,, Kilmallock, and Newcastle West (294) were awarded bronze medals in their respective categories. Ardpatrick was highly commended by the judges while Galbally was commended with Abbeyfeale (251) receiving an endeavour award after its mark improved by 7.265% compared to last year.

Chairman of Ardpatrick Community Council, Pat Casey, said locals were thrilled to get back to the second place spot after slipping down to third last year.

“We are absolutely thrilled. We are getting loads of calls. We were a bit disappointed last year to go down but fair play to Galbally, they took it – there is only one mark between us and that’s the way it was last year so it’s very tight,” he explained.

The success of the small village, he said, is down to working on the areas which the judges said could do with improvement in last year’s report.

“We looked after all the things the judges didn’t like last year and commented on - that’s very important. We have a very good report this time - probably our best report ever,” he said.

A number of features have been added to the village in recent times including a painted bicycle in the centre of the green area and a pair of concrete boots as well with flowers in them.

“All those things help out - if they are done in a tasteful manner. And we got favourable comments about the water harvesting - collecting rainwater for our plants,” said Pat.

Pat attended the awards presentation in The Helix with Catherine Herbert, Dave Meskill, and Peggy Lee. The community council also doubles up as the Tidy Towns committee.

“It is a very tense day when the results are being announced. You see your own place flashing up in a certain position and it’s a great feeling,” he said.

Limerick city centre, meanwhile, added four points to last year’s tally to secure 274 this year. And the Moyross Residents’ Forum is to receive €1,000 after it was awarded a special prize for its food waste prevention web project.