Limerick ‘tagger’ given community service order

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Rory Fogarty leaving Limerick District Court last year
A YOUNG man who caused thousands of euro worth of damage to buildings across the city by spraying them with graffiti has been ordered to complete 240 hours of community service.

A YOUNG man who caused thousands of euro worth of damage to buildings across the city by spraying them with graffiti has been ordered to complete 240 hours of community service.

Rory Fogarty, aged 20, who is originally from Thurles but who has an address at Drominbeg, Rhebogue was one of four young men prosecuted last year by gardai and Limerick City Council in relation to the so-called “tagging” of buildings over several months during 2012.

Limerick District Court was told more than €20,000 worth of damage was caused to a variety of buildings which were targeted by the defendants including shops, business premises, schools and sporting facilities.

Following the intervention of Una Heaton, the director of the Frank McCourt Museum, all four men agreed to carry out cleanup works at some of the buildings which had been tagged.

However, last summer a bench warrant was issued for the arrest of Mr Fogarty after Judge Eugene O’Kelly was told he had not carried out the clean-up works as had been agreed. Issuing the warrant, the judge commented that his attitude towards the cleanup had been “most unsatisfactory”.

Following the execution of the warrant earlier this year the judge requested that a community service report be prepared in relation to the defendant.

In relation to his non-appearance in court, solicitor Ted McCarthy said his client did not have transport available to him on the day.

He said there is an amount of disharmony in Mr Fogarty’s family and that he is “effectively without a permanent residence”.

Noting that Mr Fogarty is suitable for community service, the judge ordered that he carry out 200 hours of community service in lieu of a ten month prison sentence.

He ordered that he complete a further 40 hours as a result of his non-appearance in court earlier this year.

In doing so, he warned he faces an additional two month prison sentence, if he does not complete the hours on time.

Imposing sentence, Judge O’Kelly commented the defendant only had himself to blame as his “colleagues dealt with the consequences of their tagging in a more responsible way”.

Previously, he applied the Probation Act in the case of two other defendants while the third was ordered to carry out 90 hours of community service.