Limerick solicitor vacates €6m Gorse Hill mansion

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Brian ODonnell and his wife, Mary Patricia, vacated Gorse Hill
LIMERICK-BORN solicitor Brian O’Donnell and his wife, Mary Patricia, vacated their Gorse Hill mansion in Dublin this Wednesday - hours before a court-imposed deadline.

LIMERICK-BORN solicitor Brian O’Donnell and his wife, Mary Patricia, vacated their Gorse Hill mansion in Dublin this Wednesday - hours before a court-imposed deadline.

Last month, the family of Mr O’Donnell, who is originally from the Ennis Road, failed in their efforts to stop receivers repossessing the family home, which he insists his children are entitled to live in.

There has been huge media attention on comings and goings at the mansion in Killiney, which was once worth €30m, since the O’Donnells barricaded themselves inside the property in March.

Mr O’Donnell and his wife are being pursued for a debt of €71.5m by Bank of Ireland who have appointed a receiver to take possession of the house.

After leaving Gorse Hill shortly before 10am this Wednesday, Brian O’Donnell travelled to UCD where he attended the AGM of Bank of Ireland.

On arrival, he told reporters he was disappointed by a Supreme Court decision on Tuesday not to allow an appeal against the decision of the Court of Appeal.

He said he understood that this was because of “new rules”.

Mr O’Donnell said that he and his family had been to court 82 times and had lost 82 times which he commented was “statistically impossible”.

Later, during the AGM, Bank of Ireland’s board of directors faced hostile questioning from Mr O’Donnell’s son Blake while Mr O’Donnell himself physically tossed the keys of Gorse Hill at chief executive Richie Boucher.

The keys were on a specially printed jetting which read: “The Bloody Keys”.

While the O’Donnells have now vacated the Gorse Hill property and are said to be living with “friends and relatives”, it is understood they intend taking their case to the European Court of Human Rights in the coming days.

The six-bedroom property at the centre of the dispute includes an outdoor swimming pool, tennis courts, a gym and sauna, snooker room and wine store.

It was acquired in 1997/98 for nearly €1.4 million as the O’Donnell family residence in what was part of a “very complex legal structure”.

Following the departure of the O’Donnells’ receiver Ton Kavanagh took possession of the property,

Mr O’Donnell, who attended Crescent College Comprehensive, was known as a talented rugby player in the city, while his brothers Hugh, Richard and Robin still live locally.