Court of Appeal increases Limerick man’s prison sentence

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Gordon Ryan had his sentence increased by the Court of Appeal [Picture: Press 22]
A YOUNG man who received a lengthy prison sentence for firearms offences has had his sentence increased by the Court of Appeal.

A YOUNG man who received a lengthy prison sentence for firearms offences has had his sentence increased by the Court of Appeal.

Gordon Ryan, aged 21, who has an address at Greenfields, Rosbrien was sentenced to a total of five years imprisonment last May after he admitted possession of makeshift firearms on two separate occasions.

He pleaded guilty to suspicious possession of the weapons in the Ballinacurra Weston area on November 7, 2012 and on June 23, 2013.

He was on bail in relation to the first offence when the second offence happened.

Limerick Circuit Court was told the first offence was detected when Ryan was observed coming out of a house on Hyde Road at around 11.20pm.

He was found in possession of two steel pipes, one of which was loaded with a 12 gauge shotgun cartridge.

Ballistics experts were able to discharge a shot from the weapon, and firearms residue was found inside one of the weapons.

The second weapon was seized after a 21-year-old man sustained over 25 pellet wounds to his face and upper body, after he was allegedly lured by Ryan down an alleyway near Caledonian Park.

Judge Carroll Moran imposed a three year sentence in relation to the offence on November 7, 2012 and he imposed a consecutive three year sentence in relation to the offence on June 23, 2013 suspending the final year.

Ryan has 41 previous convictions for offences including possession of knives.

Following an appeal against the ‘undue leniency’ of the original sentence, Mr Justice George Birmingham, sitting with, Mr Justice Garrett Sheehan and Mr Justice Alan Mahon said the second offence involved the actual discharge of a firearm which caused injuries to a person and this offence was committed while Ryan was on bail.

He said there could be no basis for taking less than five years imprisonment as a starting point for imposing sentence on the second offence. “Indeed a higher sentence might well be justified” he commented.

The three-judge court imposed an eight year sentence, suspending the final twelve months.