Polish men refused entry to Limerick nightclub ordered to undergo anger management

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

The popular rugby haunt of Clohessy's on Howley's Quay, where two men were refused entry for being 'highly intoxicated'; one later caused �300 worth of damage to a cell. Picture: Adrian Butler
TWO Polish men who claimed they were “wrongly” refused entry into a Limerick nightclub because of their nationality have been ordered by a judge to undergo an anger management course.

TWO Polish men who claimed they were “wrongly” refused entry into a Limerick nightclub because of their nationality have been ordered by a judge to undergo an anger management course.

Limerick District Court heard that Michael Wronski, 20, and Czarny Wojciech, 18, both with addresses in Shannon, Co Clare, tried to gain entry to Clohessy’s on Howley’s Quay at around 1.30am on November 17, 2012.

While both men had been drinking, solicitor Sarah Ryan said they were not so intoxicated that they should have been refused entry.

One of the men asked the security guard: “Is it because I am Polish?” and he reputedly replied ‘yes’.

They then sat outside, and a “minor incident” occurred when one of the security men pushed one of the defendants off a chair.

“They saw it as a provocation by the security officers. This is something out of character for them. Gardai didn’t listen to what happened to them, and their attitude to gardai arose as a result of that,” she said.

But Judge Eugene O’Kelly said the men should have left the scene as directed and taken up the matter at a later stage with “the benefit of sobriety”.

Gardai said when they arrived at the scene the men were being threatening and abusive to staff, and were kicking the tables outside the premises.

Sergeant Donal Cronin said they were “highly intoxicated”, “extremely aggressive” to gardai and security staff, with Garda Enda Moroney and Garda Pat Ahern requiring back-up to deal with their arrests.

Wronski was charged with being threatening and abusive, and failing to comply with garda orders, while Wojciech was charged with both of these offences, and also a charge of criminal damage after he scratched his initials in the cell in Henry Street garda station using a metal part of his clothing.

Gardai said he caused €300 worth of damage, but this was disputed by Ms Ryan who said that the cells have been damaged by numerous detainees.

Judge O’Kelly adjourned the case for further consideration until September 11, for both men to undertake an anger management course. They have been remanded on continuing bail until that date.