Paris attacks: Books of condolence to be opened in Limerick

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

The scene in Paris last night, following the worst atrocity in Europe for more than a decade.
THE organisation representing Limerick’s French community is to open a book of condolence for anyone wishing to express sympathy for those killed in the multiple terror attacks in Paris.

THE organisation representing Limerick’s French community is to open a book of condolence for anyone wishing to express sympathy for those killed in the multiple terror attacks in Paris.

The Alliance Française de Limerick, based at 7 Pery Square in the city, will open the book from Monday morning in memory of those murdered during last night’s atrocities in the French capital.

A minute of silence will be observed at Munster’s home game tonight against Treviso, while local councillors will also pause to remember those who have died ahead of Monday morning’s metropolitan meeting.

The sickening attacks which have killed nearly 130 people and left another 180 seriously injured have once again plunged France into despair and shocked the wider world.

The Islamic State militant group has already claimed responsibility for the Friday night attacks.

Marie Hackett, the honorary vice-consul for France in the Limerick area said the local French community is “terribly saddened and shocked by the news”.

“Personally, I just want to convey my condolences to all the families who have lost their dear ones. It just made me realise that wherever we are, we are becoming so vulnerable to these kind of irresponsible attacks on the part of terrorists who do not respect our culture and our democracy, and it is so important for us to defend our freedom,” she told the Limerick Leader.

She urged the local French community to remain united, to “keep standing strong, whatever our religion or beliefs.”

“I just hope none of them have lost relatives or friends in these attacks. But at the same time, you cannot help but think about the people who have died,” she added.

The book of condolences will be open at 7 Pery Square between 9.30am to 2pm both Monday and Tuesday.

Meanwhile, it is likely a book of condolences will also be opened at City Hall, although the council is unlikely to confirm this until Monday.

Metropolitan district mayor Jerry O’Dea confirmed a minute of silence will be observed ahead of their meeting on Monday morning.

He described the terrorist attacks as “a black day for mankind”.

The attacks, which were carried out by eight gunmen and suicide bombers, took place at the Stade de France, the Bataclan Concert Hall - where 80 people died - plus a number of nearby bars and restaurants.

It is the worst tragedy in Europe since the 2004 Madrid bombings.