RDS Primary Science Fair to extend hub to Limerick

Fintan Walsh

Reporter:

Fintan Walsh

Minister OSullivan welcomes the news. Picture: Liam Burke/Press 22
SCIENCE will soon be at the doorstep of all Limerick city and county primary schools in 2016, as the annual RDS Primary Science Fair has chosen Mary Immaculate College (MIC) to be its new extended hub.

SCIENCE will soon be at the doorstep of all Limerick city and county primary schools in 2016, as the annual RDS Primary Science Fair has chosen Mary Immaculate College (MIC) to be its new extended hub.

Alongside the BT Young Scientists and Technology Exhibition, the fair will be open to 2,000 extra participants in the region, as it extends to MIC on January 15 and 16, next year.

The reason for the extra venue for the popular show was because organisers believed the event to be “oversubscribed”, as not all primary schools in the country could access the show in previous years.

Minister for Education Jan O’Sullivan welcomed the news, saying it is an “absolutely brilliant opportunity for Limerick”.

“There was a decision to have another venue outside of Dublin and, thankfully, Limerick has been successful, and Mary Immaculate College is going to provide that venue. It will be available in January when the fair is normally held, and will now allow 2,000 further participants.”

The Labour TD added that this will encourage primary school pupils to participate in more science, technology, engineering and maths subjects.

“This gives pupils at primary level an opportunity to learn skills in that area, and it really does encourage their creativity, and it gives them an early taste of excitement of these subjects,” she commented.

The RDS science chairperson Ingrid Hook said that this news is a result of people’s understanding of science’s economic impact on Ireland.

“I think parents and teachers are beginning to understand the importance of science to the economy. You have got all the various farming companies in the agri business and it is hugely important, and one needs to harness the interest of children to help them understand the importance of science.”

MIC president Michael A Hayes says this will show off the college’s expertise in primary science.