10-year-old broke into business premises in Limerick

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Judge Mary Larkin was visibly shocked when informed of the defendant's age
A TEN-year-old boy and his teenage brother broke into a number of business premises on the northside of the city in the early hours of the morning, a court has heard.

A TEN-year-old boy and his teenage brother broke into a number of business premises on the northside of the city in the early hours of the morning, a court has heard.

While the 10-year-old was not prosecuted because of his age, his brother pleaded guilty to burglary charges when he appeared before the children’s court.

Judge Mary Larkin was told the youths were found at a premises in the Thomondgate area at around 5.45am on November 27, last.

A glass door was broken at the premises and an adjacent premises was also been broken into on the same night.

The 17-year-old, who cannot be named, pleaded guilty to a plethora of other charges relating to what was described by Judge Larkin as a “criminal rampage”.

The court heard the defendant broke into four houses in the Kileely area of the city on a single night last November and that he broke into the Treaty Veterinary Clinic, Thomondgate on December 4, last.

Other offences included having a bolt-cutters at Pery Square on November 19, last; possession of a concealed flick-knife at Quarry Road, Thomondgate on September 20, last and possession of a claw hammer in 2013.

The defendant, who has eight previous convictions. also admitted cycling on a stolen pedal-bike, damaging a window at the Travelodge Coonagh, stealing a bar of chocolate from Topaz, Thomondgate and stealing two mobile phones from outside a house on North Circular Road.

Solicitor Ted McCarthy said his client, whose girlfriend is pregnant, spent Christmas in detention and that the experience was a “significant wake-up” call for the teenager, who turns 18 later this year.

Mr McCarthy said the youth only began abusing drink and drugs in the past year and that he acknowledges it has to be addressed.

Judge Larkin said it is “extremely difficult” for any judge to deny a juvenile of their liberty but that she was satisfied she had no option but to sentence him to nine months detention.

Following an application from Sgt Donal Cronin, the judge ordered that should the defendant lodge an appeal he must obey by a number of strict bail conditions.