Public counters at council’s Croom and Annacotty offices to close

Donal O’Regan

Reporter:

Donal O’Regan

The changes mean that members of the public will now access services at council buildings in Dooradoyle or Merchants Quay
LIMERICK City and County Council has announced the public counter and cash point facility will no longer be available at its offices in Annacotty and Croom from Friday, October 31.

LIMERICK City and County Council has announced the public counter and cash point facility will no longer be available at its offices in Annacotty and Croom from Friday, October 31.

“The low demand for public services at these locations makes it unsustainable to keep them open to the public. The small number of staff manning the public counter will be moved to new roles within Limerick City and County Council,” said a spokesperson.

“The operational delivery of services will continue as normal. These changes mean that members of the public will now access services at Limerick City and County Council buildings at Dooradoyle or Merchant’s Quay.

“They can do this by phone, email or by calling in,” they add.

Customers are being assisted in setting up alternative pay methods for services such as rent payments which can also be made at local post offices. Limerick City and County Council is also contacting its individual customers regarding future arrangements.

Customers can contact them on 061-496200 or email customerservices@limerick.ie

The move has been criticised by Sinn Féin’s Cmhlr Séighin Ó Ceallaigh who has come out strongly in opposition to the closures. “This move increases the centralisation of council services, and will lead to a weakening of the council structure. People from parts of the constituency of Limerick City East, including Castletroy, Monaleen and Annacotty itself, will now have to travel into the city centre or Dooradoyle in order to approach the council with various issues. These central offices will now be put under even greater pressure, as from next month they will have a much larger workload.”

“Elected councillors have had no say at all in this move, and it is something I would have certainly voted against. We now have a council where less gets done, and where decisions such as this are not brought through the democratic process. I know that this will affect the city and county as a whole, and that the residents of these areas, as well as council staff will suffer from this centralisation,” said Cmhlr Ó Ceallaigh.

“On October 31, the amalgamation of Limerick City Council and Limerick County Council will once again prove to be a mistake made by the Fine Gael and Labour coalition. The reason for the local government reform was in order to put people first, but really they are putting people last. The centralisation of council services, as well as the wide range of issues and views from rural and urban areas have proven to have been a bad idea,” he concludes.