Limerick gardai on alert as Ger Dundon returns

David Hurley

Reporter:

David Hurley

Ger Dundon has returned to Limerick in recent weeks
GARDAI across the city are closely monitoring the movements of gangland figure Ger Dundon, following his recent return to the Limerick from the UK.

GARDAI across the city are closely monitoring the movements of gangland figure Ger Dundon, following his recent return to the Limerick from the UK.

Over the past few weeks, Dundon, 27, who was released from Wheatfield prison in January has been spotted in and around the family stronghold at Hyde Road as well as in the vicinity of Limerick Courthouse.

Since his release, Dundon has spent most of his time living in the UK and continental Europe.

While he has returned to Limerick briefly on a number of occasions since his release, gardai believe he may now have moved back permanently.

While his return is being linked to a recent arson attack on a car at Raheen Square, gardai are playing down suggestions that a major drugs turf war is about to erupt.

“We are watching him alright but it is out of caution more than anything else because you just don’t know what he is going to do,” said one source.

While the car which was set alight since Dundon’s return belongs to a suspected small-time drug dealer, investigating gardai are not satisfied, at this stage, that the attack represented the first shots of a turf war.

Dundon, the former partner of April Collins, received a five-year prison sentence in February 2011 after he was convicted of violent disorder following an incident in the area Garryowen in February of the previous year.

The prosecution followed attempts by Dundon and other members of the McCarthy-Dundon gang to collect €20,000 they believed they was owed by nightclub promoter Mark Heffernan.

He returned to Limerick for a short time at the end of June and also attended the Special Criminal Court in Dublin during the closing stages of the trial of his brother, Wayne, for the murder of businessman Roy Collins.Previously Dundon’s lawyers indicated he planned to move to the UK “for the rest of his life” following his release from prison.

In September 2013, Brendan Nix SC, told the Court of Criminal Appeal that Dundon, who has more than 100 previous convictions, “knows he has no future here” and “knows there is no future” in Limerick.

He added that he intended seeking employment in England following his release from prison.

Dundon’s brother Wayne, 36, is currently serving a life sentence after he was convicted at the Special Criminal Court earlier this year of ordering the murder of Roy Collins in April 2009.

Another brother, John Dundon, 30, is also serving a life sentence after he was found guilty, last year, of ordering the murder of innocent rugby player, Shane Geoghegan, who was shot near his home in Dooradoyle November 2008.

“There is no doubt that he [Ger Dundon] is bad and dangerous but he is nothing like his brothers,” said a garda source.