Criminal Dundon ‘blocked’ from desire to learn Arabic and Turkish

A CONVICTED LIMERICK criminal has complained about his access to educational facilities in a high security prison, claiming he wants to learn Arabic and Turkish.

A CONVICTED LIMERICK criminal has complained about his access to educational facilities in a high security prison, claiming he wants to learn Arabic and Turkish.

Wayne Dundon, from the Hyde Road in Limerick, is taking a case in the High Court against a decision by the authorities at Cloverhill Prison to isolate him from the mainstream prison population.

The case has been further adjourned to later this month after talks failed to resolve the dispute.

Dundon claims his segregation breaches natural and constitutional justice and the prison’s own rules.

He also has had restrictions placed on family visits.

In judicial review proceedings against the governor of Cloverhill Prison, the Minister for Justice and the State, Dundon has sought orders including one requiring his transfer to an ordinary block within the mainstream prison.

He also wants to take part in structured activities for not less than five hours a day, five days a week. Alternatively, he has sought a transfer out of Cloverhill into an ordinary block of another prison.

The respondents contend that Dundon has no arguable case.

In the amended claim, Dundon wants a declaration that, from April to early September, his segregation in Cloverhill breached natural and constitutional justice and the prison rules.

All other aspects of Dundon’s action have been struck out. The judge said she was adopting this approach because, since launching his High Court action, Dundon had received at least one contact visit from his family.

Since early last month, the prison governor had informed Dundon he was being segregated for reasons including Dundon’s history of involvement in violence and of breaking prison rules.

Ms Justice Maureen Clark adjourned the matter to later this month after Pádraig Dwyer SC, for Dundon, said talks between the sides had failed to resolve the action.

The judge added she was bemused by some of Dundon’s claims, including a wish to learn Arabic and Turkish.

Ms Justice Clarke also agreed that Dundon’s lawyers may amend his case where many of the issues raised had since been dealt with.

The matter was adjourned for mention before the president of the High Court, Mr Justice Nicholas Kearns, later this month.