Jury sent home overnight in Shane Geoghegan murder trial

Petula Martyn at the

Reporter:

Petula Martyn at the

THE family of Shane Geoghegan continue to wait for a verdict at the trial of the man accused of the rugby player’s murder, after eight hours of deliberations by the jury who were sent home by the presiding judge at the Central Criminal Court this Monday evening.

THE family of Shane Geoghegan continue to wait for a verdict at the trial of the man accused of the rugby player’s murder, after eight hours of deliberations by the jury who were sent home by the presiding judge at the Central Criminal Court this Monday evening.

After deliberating for eight hours, the jury of six men and five women returned to the court room at 5.20pm to ask Mr Justice Paul Carney if they could finish for the evening.

The foreman told the judge that members of the jury have prior arrangements including a funeral that a juror wanted to attend.

The judge acceded to their request and told them to return to court on Tuesday morning to resume their deliberations.

Members of Shane Geoghegan’s family, including his mother, Mary, his brother, Anthony, and his girlfriend, Jenna, have been at the Courts of Criminal Justice awaiting a verdict following a four-week trial which included two weeks of legal argument.

Barry Doyle, with addresses at Portland Row, Dublin and Hyde Road, Limerick has pleaded not guilty to murdering Mr Geoghegan at Clonmore, Kilteragh, on November 9, 2008.

The 25-year-old faces a mandatory life sentence if he is found guilty by the jury of the murder.

The jury were sent out to begin their deliberations on Friday after one of the jurors was discharged because his father is ill.

They resumed their deliberations at 11am this Monday morning and were brought back into the court room an hour later, when the foreman was asked by the judge if they had reached an unanimous verdict. The foreman said they had not.

Mr Justice Carney said it was desireable that the jury remain unanimous, but he said he could accept a majority verdict. “I can now accept a verdict of 10 to one.”

Later, the jury returned to seek clarification on what constitutes murder. The judge told the jurors that murder is the unlawful killing of another with intent, where the intention is either to kill or cause serious harm.

The foreman then asked the judge what level of involvement constitutes murder, and Mr Justice Carney responded by saying, it is the State’s case that Barry Doyle was the gunman. “What more involvement do you need?” he stated.

The jury will resume their deliberations at 11am on Tuesday.