PGA Golf Academy set for base at University of Limerick

Anne Sheridan

Reporter:

Anne Sheridan

What are the secrets to being a good golfer? UL is endeavouring to find out what it takes to be as good as champions like Rory McIlroy
THE secrets of Rory McIlroy’s swing could well be discovered in Limerick - if plans are approved for Ireland’s first universit-based golf academy at the University of Limerick.

THE secrets of Rory McIlroy’s swing could well be discovered in Limerick - if plans are approved for Ireland’s first universit-based golf academy at the University of Limerick.

UL, in conjunction with the PGA, is developing on campus a purpose-built facility with flood-lit golf range, putting and pitching green and bunkers. There will be accredited academic programme delivery and golf-oriented external courses and training in conjunction with the PGA.

In a planning notice published this week, Plassey Campus Developments say they intend to apply for permission to Limerick City and County Council to construct a single storey, PGA- accredited golf academy building, incorporating 19 covered driving range bays, two teaching bays, two manufactured bays, and other associated works.

The proposed development will be located some 730 metres from Plassey House, a protected structure. An impact statement on how the development could affect its surroundings will be submitted with the plans.

Golf performance is identified as an ‘emerging interdisciplinary research area’ within UL’s strategic plan research activity in sport and human performance.

“Golf Performance at UL seeks to provide research understanding and evidence in golf science in the areas of biomechanics, psychology, and physiology of the player, materials science of the equipment, as well as development of the game for social and physical activity benefits,” they state.

Financial accounts filed recently for Plassey Campus Developments, for the year ending 2014, show that it had a turnover of €15.7m in 2014, up from €3m in 2013.

The bulk of the former sum was paid out to subcontractors and in design fees for a number of new buildings on campus.

They included the Bernal building for science and research, now known as the Analog Devices building.

Construction work is now underway for the training centre for Munster Rugby, which will accommodate a gym area, medical rooms, physiotherapy rooms, coaching and video analysis rooms, meeting rooms, changing areas and administration offices together with ancillary accommodation.