Limerick brother and sister to help Zambia’s vulnerable

Nick Rabbitts

Reporter:

Nick Rabbitts

Eoin and Niamh Hogan, Ardnacrusha and Sr Dymphna Clancy who are travelling to Africa to volunteer in an orphanage. Picture: Adrian Butler
A LIMERICK brother-and-sister are set to travel to Zambia to help out vulnerable young women in a hospice set up by the Salesian Sisters.

A LIMERICK brother-and-sister are set to travel to Zambia to help out vulnerable young women in a hospice set up by the Salesian Sisters.

Eoin Hogan, 22, and his sister Niamh, 20, will travel to Mazabuka - known as the City of Joy - to a hospice set up by Vides, a charity which promotes voluntary service and the protection of human rights, especially among women and young people.

They will fly over in early September, and spend seven weeks there.

This Saturday night, the pair are to hold a fundraising concert at Dolan’s Pub at the Dock Road to raise vital funds to support the hospice, which looks after women and girls aged from nine years old upwards.

Student Eoin and his sister Niamh, who works in Timberland, O’Connell Street, will be bringing tin whistles to the African city to show the children how to play the instrument.

Savin’s Music Store has kindly agreed to provide subsidised whistles, which people can buy in the shop and donate to Eoin and Niamh to take over.

As well as this, Eoin is hoping to help the girls with their writing.

He explained: “I am hoping to teach a bit of creative writing while I am out there. I am also looking to do a radio documentary.”

Both say they expect the experience to be “life-changing”.

“It is great that we are going together as it means we will be able to support one another,” Niamh said, “I am really excited to be going over there.”

Salesian sister Sr Dympna Clancy from Westbury met the pair in her capacity as the Irish delegate to Vides.

She said the mission provides a home for young girls at risk in Mazabuka. It is hoped to develop a school on the site.

“It caters for all their needs, from schooling to their educational and physical needs,” she explained, “There is also a farm there, where they grow vegetables, which they can then sell at the market, and the sisters will place the money they earn into a bank which they can access when they leave the mission. It will help them to readjust back into life with their families.”

Entry to the fundraiser in Dolan’s costs €5, and all money raised will go to the mission.

For more information, to donate a tin whistle, or find out other ways to help, telephone 085-7359060.